Friday November 3, 2017

Thursday’s high, 63;Overnight low 45, went up to 55 during night, .28” rain
FRI-CLOUDY WITH SHOWERS, HIGH 55
FRI NIGHT-CLOUDY, LOW 39
SAT-SHOWERS, HIGH 53
SAT NIGHT-RAIN 38
SUN-RAIN 64
SUN NIGHT-CLOUDY, LOW 43

To hear today’s forecast, click on arrow below.

Remember to turn your clock back one hour Saturday night….Elk County Sheriff asks residents to be on the lookout for suspicious box trucks…..Constitutional question on Tuesday’s ballot…..Elderly Weedville man accused of inappropriate contact with four children…Theft of equipment from Sweden Valley business investigated….Teen driver hurt in Elk County crash…..

To hear today’s podcast, click on arrow below.

Turn Your  Clocks Back This Weekend. Daylight saving time will end at 2 a.m. on Sunday, Nov. 5, and Pennsylvania residents will be turning their clocks back one hour before going to bed on Saturday night. Experts recommend using this reminder to check or change the batteries in smoke detectors and carbon monoxide alarms. Smoke detectors and carbon monoxide alarms should be replaced every 10 years, and located near bedrooms and on each level of the residence.

We wondered about things like this when we reported earlier in the week that a Dubois woman has failed to return a U-Haul box truck to an Elk County business., Now, the Elk County Sheriff’s Office has issued an alert for citizens to be attentive for Budget Rental Trucks that me be in the area or parked near businesses or homes. The trucks generally display an out of state license plate and are presented as being under lease by an overseas company. their purpose is unknown, however it does not appear to be consistent with a typical rental and move. If anyone observes these unusual activites, please contact your local police department.

You may not know much about the judges on next Tuesday’s ballot but there is a referendum that will directly affect area residents. Rep. Martin Causer told Black Forest Broadcasting News he is in favor of the measure.On the Nov. 7 general election ballot, voters will have an opportunity to vote on a property tax reform measure. Currently, the state Constitution permits local governments – counties, municipalities and school districts – to exclude up to 50 percent of the median assessed home value from a homeowner’s tax bill. However, the referendum on the ballot will allow voters to decide if the maximum homestead exclusion could be increased to 100 percent of primary residences.
For example, under the current homestead exclusion, if the median assessed home value in your school district is $100,000, up to $50,000 can be excluded from your tax bill if your school district elected the full 50 percent exclusion rate. If the value of your home is assessed at $150,000, your local property tax rate would only be applied to $100,000 of that value. If the resolution amending the Constitution is approved, the homestead exclusion cap could be removed.
However, the General Assembly would still have to pass a law to implement the change, and local governments would still be responsible for establishing exclusion amounts for homesteads within each district.

An elderly Weedville man has been jailed on several counts relating to inappropriate contact with children. Eugene Thomas Lalley of Poplar Road was arrested Thursday by state police who were contacted by representatives of the St. Marys school district. Officials told police a staff member overhead statements from one of the four alleged victims that Lalley had committed sexual assault. The four children, not related to the defendant, were in his care at the time of the alleged crimes. Lalley was taken into custody without incident and was committed to the Elk County Prison in lieu of $30,000 cash bail after bneing arraigned on four counts each of corruption of minors, unlawful contact with aminor, indecent assault, and indecent exposure.

Mansfield state police arrest 58 yer old Eric Levengood of Canton for harassment after he continued to make phone calls to a 45 year old Roaring Branch woman for the past several months even after being told to stop.

A burglary at a Sweden Valley business earlier this week is being investigated by state police at Coudersport. Sometime between 8:30 am Tuesday and 8:45 am Wednesday, criminals stole a 2016 camouflage Kubota TRV-X1120 side by side UTV and an orange Kubota B2850 tractor with an attached front bucket and mowing deck. No value of the stolen equipment was provided by authorities are asking anyone who has information to call the at 814.274.8690.

Troopers at Mansfield investigated a minor theft taking place Tuesday night at a Westfield home. Someone siphoned about a gallon of gasoline out of a lawn tractor owned by David Foster which was parked behind his house.

Minor injuries were reported for a Ridgway teen driver after a one-vehicle crash Wednesday afternoon in Jones Township, Elk County. State police report a Nissan Sentra driven by 19 year old Jasmine Carlson went off the road on a left hand turn, collided with a tree and rolled over several times before stopping at the bottom of an embankment upright.She was taken to Penn Highland Elk by ambulance.

A Murrysville man escaped injury in a car/deer collision early this morning in Shippen Township, Cameron County. According to state police at the Emporium barracks, Aaron Voegtle was going east on Route 10 just after 5:00 am when the whitetail bounded onto the highway in front of his Honda Civic.

Thursday November 2, 2017

 

Wednesday’s high, 45; Overnight low, 45; .70” rain
THU-CLOUDY, RAIN HIGH 62
THU NIGHT-RAIN DECREASES, LOW 57
FRI-AM RAIN, TAPERING OFF HIGH 58
FRI NIGHT-CLOUDY, LOW 39
SAT-SOME SHOWERS, HIGH 54
SAT NIGHT-CLOUDY, LOW 46

To hear today’s forecast, click on arrow below.

BFB Headlines (Thursday November 2, 2017) More drug collection boxes located across state….new bill encourages hospitals to establish detox beds…Individuals and organizations encouraged to apply for environmental awards…Blossburg teen arrested for threatening neighbors….Two Tioga women hurt in car/deer collision….

To hear today’s podcast, click on arrow below.

Obituaries: Amy Law, (Hebron Township), Pearl Snyder,  (Genesee). Lila Darling (N. Chili, NY) Betty Bell (Eldred)

As part of the ongoing effort to curb the opioid epidemic in Pennsylvania, officials with the Wolf Administration have announced the opening of 65 prescription drug take-back boxes at Pennsylvania State Police (PSP) stations across the commonwealth..

The goal of the initiative is to create a safe method for the disposal of expired or unwanted prescription and over-the-counter medication. Medicines that languish in home medicine cabinets and other locations are at risk of misuse and abuse.

PSP stations provide highly visible, well-known locations for prescription drug take-back boxes with lobbies that are open 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

In 2016, more than 4,800 Pennsylvanians died from a drug overdose. Facilitating the proper disposal of prescription and over-the-counter medications is one way state police are working to keep dangerous pills from falling into the wrong hands.

With the addition of these new prescription drug take-back boxes in the Pennsylvania State Police barracks, there are now have almost 680 drug take-back boxes in local law enforcement and other locations.

There is  a statewide interactive map to help people find the nearest prescription drug take-back box. Since the program began in 2015, the commonwealth has collected and destroyed 301,388 pounds of drugs.

CVS Health donated the collection boxes – valued at $685 each – through a partnership with the DDAP. Any solid prescription or over-the-counter medication (pills and capsules) may be anonymously deposited in the secure boxes, including pet medicine. “Sharps” (needles, syringes, EpiPens), liquids, and illicit drugs (heroin, marijuana, LSD, etc.) are not accepted.
Contents of the take-back boxes will be safely destroyed on a quarterly basis by the Pennsylvania National Guard. Contents will be weighed, but no identifying information will be recorded or shared.

Meanwhile, the governor has House Bill 118, which establishes the Emergency Drug and Alcohol Detoxification Program, was recently signed into law as Act 40 of 2017.
Act 40 of 2017 encourages existing health care facilities to convert beds to provide medically supervised detoxification to help ensure emergency drug and alcohol detoxification services are available in community hospitals.

The bill’s sponsor Rep. Aaron Kaufer’s (R-Luzerne) says, “There has been a shortage of detoxification beds within our state,” Kaufer explained. “When people overdose and receive care, they’re then sent home, rather than staying in a supervised setting where treatment can begin immediately. This law will now provide a safe and helpful environment for patients to begin the next step of their recovery.”

All Pennsylvanians who have recently worked on successful environmental projects to apply for the state’s top environmental recognition: the 2018 Governor’s Awards for Environmental Excellence, honoring individuals and organizations whose dedicated efforts have improved air, land, and water quality in Pennsylvania.

DEP oversees the application and award selection process. Projects are evaluated on the basis of seven criteria: degree of environmental protection, climate change, sustainability, partnership, economic impact, innovation, and environmental education and outreach. A project doesn’t have to meet all criteria to merit an award.

The award is open to all individuals, whether a project leader or participant, and to all schools, nonprofit organizations, businesses, farms, and government agencies. Past winners may submit applications for new projects, but projects that have previously received a Governor’s Award for Environmental Excellence are not eligible.

For the first time this year,applications are now being accepted online. The deadline for submission is Monday, January 8, 2018, at 5 p.m. Eligible projects must have been completed before November 1, 2017. Submission guidelines may be found at the application page.

Last year, 21 organizations received awards. Their projects collectively saved 8 million kWh/year; reduced annual greenhouse gas emissions by 14,608 metric tons; captured 3.2 million gallons of storm water runoff; saved over $105 million in operation, maintenance, and energy use expenses; conserved 3 million gallons of water; engaged 8,500 students in environmental issues; recycled 68,000 plastic bags; properly disposed of 5,287 tires; and treated 450.5 million gallons of stream water that had been laced with acid mine drainage.

The Governor’s Awards for Environmental Excellence have been presented since 1996.

An 18 year old Bloss Township resident has been charged with disorderly conduct after allegedly threatening his Walnut Street neighbors last Thursday night in Blossburg. Mansfield based state police did not release the suspect’s name but said a summary charge will be filed in district court.

A Tioga, PA woman and her passenger were hurt in a car/deer collision Monday afternoon in Richmond Township, Tioga County. Mansfield based state po9lice report Jody Hedger was going south when the whitetail came onto Route 15 in front of her Chrysler Towns and County. Hedges was unable to avoid contact .She and her passenger Kassandra Velasquewz also of Tioga were taken to Soldiers and Sailors hospital tor treatment of unknown injuries.

Obituaries

Amy J. Law, 60, of Hebron Township, passed away October 28 at Cole Memorial Hospital. Born August 14, 1957 to William and Lucille (Evans) Law in Pittsburgh, Amy grew up in the Pittsburgh area, but fell in love with rural north-central Pennsylvania. She moved to Hebron Township 10 years ago. She was an avid reader, enjoyed her puppies, loved to travel and traveled the world. Her move allowed her to enjoy riding her 4-wheeler, and involvement with the H+A Sporting Club of Hebron.
She is survived by her close friend Nancy Wojciechowicz of Hebron; her father William Law of Pittsburgh; 1 brother William Law of Alabama; 3 sisters: Allison (Jason) Ketter of Pittsburgh, Julie (Frank) Heidel of Florida, and Melanie (Frank) Costanza of Castle Shannon, PA; 4 nieces and nephews: Frank Costanza and Maria Costanza of Pittsburgh, and Alexandra Dumrauf and William Dumrauf of Florida; and her extended local family: Paul, Cheryl, Byron, Calee, Kyle, Zachary, and Nicholas Phelps, Paula, Mike, Clayton and Taylor Tarabori, Bill, Theresa, and Kirsten Denhoff.
Amy’s friends and family will celebrate her life in the spring of next year.

Pearl I. SNYDER, 82, of Genesee, PA, died Tuesday, October 31, 2017 in her home. Born May 8, 1935, in Westfield, PA, she was the daughter of Ernest and Ruth Williamson Benson. On May 30, 1952, in Harrison Valley, PA, she married William J. “Bill” Snyder, who predeceased her on April 17, 2011. A graduate of cosmetology school in Olean, she worked as a hairdresser in Wellsville, NY. She was later employed by First Citizens National Bank in Genesee, Citizens & Northern Bank in Elkland and Knoxville, and Commonwealth Bank in Lawrenceville. Pearl was a 50-year member of the Genesee United Methodist Church, where she served as a Sunday school teacher for many years, and a member of the Gold Church for the last 15 years.
Surviving are: four children, Debbie (Tim) Freeman of Ulysses, Sandy (Chuck) Symonds of Elkland, Terry (Kim) Snyder of Genesee, and Edie Jo (Bernie) Seligman of Genesee; five grandchildren, Chad (Beverly) Freeman, Troy (Mary Jane) Freeman, Shelle (Ben) Lee, Jami Doan, and Abby (Ward) Slocum; 13 great-grandchildren; a brother, Hervey (Diane) Benson of Middlebury Center; nieces, nephews, and cousins. In addition to her husband, she was predeceased by a brother, William H. Benson; and three sisters, Jean Lese, Emma Simmons Whitney, and Ruth Giantomasi.
Friends may call Friday, November 3, 2017 from 2:00 – 4:00 and 7:00 – 9:00 PM at the Gold Church, 2402 SR 49 W, Ulysses, PA, where Funeral Services will be held on Saturday at 11:00 AM. The Rev. Frank Mickle, Pastor, will officiate. Burial will be in Ulysses Cemetery.
Memorials may be made to Gold Church, 2402 SR 49 W, Ulysses, PA 16948, Genesee Volunteer Fire Company, P.O. Box 9, Genesee, PA 16923, or Potter County Hospice, c/o Cole Memorial Hospital, 1001 E. Second St., Coudersport, PA 16915. Arrangements are entrusted to Olney Funeral Home & Cremation Service, Ulysses, PA.
Online condolences may be expressed at www.olneyfuneralhome.com.

Lila Jean Robson Darling, 84, of North Chili, NY returned to her heavenly home on October 28, 2017. Her devotion to her family and her abiding trust in God supported her gave her peace.
Jean was born on November 4, 1932 to the late Robert J. and Hazel Robson, both respected life-long residents of Eldred, PA. Jean was a graduate of Eldred High School and attended one-year at Roberts Wesleyan College where she met the love of her life Richard. She married Richard Morse Darling, on June 12, 1954 in Port Allegany, PA. In 1953, she graduated from Mansfield State Teachers College. She taught school for several years near Albany, NY while her husband completed school.
Jean was blessed with a large and loving family and her true calling and passion was being a homemaker and raising four wonderful sons. Jean was a perfect match for Richard. Her support, love and devotion to him was evident to all. Together they raised their children with patience, discipline and humility. From the very beginning, she dedicated her children to God and encouraged them follow the Lord with all their hearts. Their home was filled by her warm spirit of hospitality and generosity. She loved to travel, do ceramics, was actively involved in community services such as teaching English as a second language and the Christian Women’s Association. She held deep and abiding friendships and was very proud of her family legacy.
Jean is survived by, Richard her of husband of 63 years; her sons Jim (Carolann) of Groton, NY, Ed (Donna) of Baldwinsville, NY, Tom (Miki) of Rockville, MD and Bill (Beth) of Amherst, NH. Grandchildren: Jamie, Amanda, Danielle, DeAnna, Paul, Lydia, Caleb, Alexis, Sam, Isabella, and Ezra. Great Granddaughter: Iris. Her Grandchildren were a tremendous joy in life. She was predeceased by her brothers, John Robson and Earl Robson and her parents.
Friends may call Saturday, November 4, 2017 from 10:00 to 11:00 am at United Methodist Church in Eldred, PA. Funeral services will be held at 11:00 am. Officiated by Pastor Paul Livermore, Ph.D. Burial will be at the Lamphier Cemetery. A reception will be held at the church.
A Memorial Service will be held 2:00 pm, November 11, 2017 at Pearce Memorial Free Methodist Church, North Chili, NY. Officiated by Orrin Bowman.
In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to Roberts Wesleyan College “The Roberts Fund,” in memory of Jean at www.roberts.edu/onlinegiving.

Betty L. Bell, 81, of Eldred, passed away on Sunday (October 29, 2017) at the WCA Hospital in Jamestown.
Born May 08th 1936 in Olean, NY she was a daughter of Wilber and Edith Griemer Repine. On August 30, 1952 in Portville, she married Marvin “Gus” Bell, who preceded her in death on October 01, 1981.
Betty attended Eldred High School and was a lifetime resident of Eldred. She had been employed at the Eldred Borough Cafeteria, Fibercel Co. of Portville and then had worked at Todd Busses of Eldred until her illness.
She enjoyed walking, loved reading, baking and taking care of her lawn. Betty loved her family and especially spending time with her grandchildren and great-grandchildren.
Surviving are three sons, Michael (Sue) Bell of Eldred and their children, Kelly (Jim), Heather (Scott) and Michelle (Tyler), and son, Terry (Pattie) Bell of Eldred and their children, Tara (Jim), Courtney, Carrie (Brett) and Bud (Kristin), and son Jack (Carla) Bell of Eldred and their children, Jacee and Tim. One daughter Linda (Joe) Hirliman of Jamestown, NY. and their children, Joe (Terri), Jeremy (Dena) and John (Jessica) and twenty-five great grandchildren. One brother, Robert (JoAnn) Repine of Eldred and a sister, Sue (Patrick) Barrett of Ceres, NY;
Friends may call Wednesday at the Frame Funeral Home, Eldred from 3:00 to 7:00 p.m. where the Rosary will be recited at 6:45 P.M. A mass of Christian burial will be held on Thursday at noon at St. Raphael’s Church in Eldred with Rev. Thomas Brown and Rev. Brian Vossler, officiating. Burial will follow in the Chestnut Hill Cemetery in Portville.
Memorial contributions may be made to the charity of the donor’s choice.

Lila Jean Robson Darling, 84, of North Chili, NY returned to her heavenly home on October 28, 2017. Her devotion to her family and her abiding trust in God supported her gave her peace.Jean was born on November 4, 1932 to the late Robert J. and Hazel Robson, both respected life-long residents of Eldred, PA. Jean was a graduate of Eldred High School and attended one-year at Roberts Wesleyan College where she met the love of her life Richard. She married Richard Morse Darling, on June 12, 1954 in Port Allegany, PA. In 1953, she graduated from Mansfield State Teachers College. She taught school for several years near Albany, NY while her husband completed school.
Jean was blessed with a large and loving family and her true calling and passion was being a homemaker and raising four wonderful sons. Jean was a perfect match for Richard. Her support, love and devotion to him was evident to all. Together they raised their children with patience, discipline and humility. From the very beginning, she dedicated her children to God and encouraged them follow the Lord with all their hearts. Their home was filled by her warm spirit of hospitality and generosity. She loved to travel, do ceramics, was actively involved in community services such as teaching English as a second language and the Christian Women’s Association. She held deep and abiding friendships and was very proud of her family legacy.
Jean is survived by, Richard her of husband of 63 years; her sons Jim (Carolann) of Groton, NY, Ed (Donna) of Baldwinsville, NY, Tom (Miki) of Rockville, MD and Bill (Beth) of Amherst, NH. Grandchildren: Jamie, Amanda, Danielle, DeAnna, Paul, Lydia, Caleb, Alexis, Sam, Isabella, and Ezra. Great Granddaughter: Iris. Her Grandchildren were a tremendous joy in life. She was predeceased by her brothers, John Robson and Earl Robson and her parents.
Friends may call Saturday, November 4, 2017 from 10:00 to 11:00 am at United Methodist Church in Eldred, PA. Funeral services will be held at 11:00 am. Officiated by Pastor Paul Livermore, Ph.D. Burial will be at the Lamphier Cemetery. A reception will be held at the church.
A Memorial Service will be held 2:00 pm, November 11, 2017 at Pearce Memorial Free Methodist Church, North Chili, NY. Officiated by Orrin Bowman.
In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to Roberts Wesleyan College “The Roberts Fund,” in memory of Jean at www.roberts.edu/onlinegiving.

Wednesday November 1, 2017

Tuesday’s high, 44; overnight low 25, trace of precipitation
WED-EARLY WINTRY MIX, THEN RAIN, HIGH 43
WED NIGHT-CLOUDY,LOW 39
THU-SCATTERED SHOWERS, MOSTLY CLOUDY, HIGH 62
THU NIGHT-CLOUDY, LOW 49
FRI-SHOWERS, THEN CLEARING HIGH 59
FRI NIGHT-LOW 38

To hear today’s forecast, click on arrow below.

 

Unemployment improved in most area counties last month…..Rep. Baker in Washington for President’s opioid announcement…..Potter County Historical Society produces road tours book….Cameron County gears up for holiday shopping….Blossburg woman accused of letting dog run loose….19 year old Coudersport driver arrested for driving under the influence of drugs…

To hear today’s Podcast, click on arrow below.

The region’s unemployment rate improved in three counties and held steady in two others in the Black Forest Broadcasting Service area between August and September according to figures just released by the state department of Labor and Industry. The jobless rate decreased from 6.2% to 6.0% in Potter County; from 5.7% in 5.5% in McKean County; and from 4.7% TO 4.4% in Elk County. Unemployment held steady at 5.5% in Tioga and 6.7% in Cameron County, the highest in Pennsylvania followed by Forest at 6.5%, an increase of 2/10ths of a percent in the period. Potter moved up to 5th place from the bottom in Pennsylvania. The statewide jobless rate was 4.5% and the national figure was 4.2.

According to the Pennsylvania Department of Health, 13 Pennsylvanians are dying everyday due to an opioid or heroin overdose. In 2016, 4,812 Pennsylvanians died from an overdose of opioid drugs. There have been several opiod overdose deaths in the Black Forest Broadcasting Service Area.
Earlier in the week, Baker co-hosted the 2017 Rural Pennsylvania Legislative Briefing on “Addressing the Challenges of Addiction in Rural Pennsylvania.” During the meeting, officials talked in depth about the opioid epidemic and its impact on the already stressed and limited services available in rural areas of the state.

Baker said the president’s declaration will help expand access to medical services in rural areas, as well as expand telemedicine services, which are of great use to less populated areas.

According to Potter County’s official Website, Potter County Today, the Historical Society has released a new guide that offers six options for those who wish to explore the county’s roots. It’s designed as a tool to deepen local residents’ appreciation of their heritage and assist tourists who are looking for interesting adventures, according to society president David Castano. Copies of the 80-page booklet are available at the PCHS museum on North Main Street in Coudersport.

Six routes are laid out in the guide based on regions of Potter County. The booklet contains summaries of local industries, individuals and communities. Road maps with directions have been added to each section. Dozens of archival photos provide an important visual element to the engaging text. On the Northwestern Tour, drivers can see the site of a pallisaded Native American village dating back to the late Fifteenth Century. The Southeastern Tour recalls the rise and fall of the village of Cross Fork, which was teeming with a population of 2,500 or more residents plus twice that many itinerants during the lumber book of the early Twentieth Century. PCHS dedicated the booklet to the late Bob and Maxine Currin, each of whom was active with the society. They were known to take regular driving tours to explore Potter County history.

The Cameron County Chamber of Commerce and Artisan Centerare planning for the gift giving season. Hours are adjusted starting today The store front is open 10am-4pm Monday through Friday. Tuesday night extra hours include 6:30-9:00pm. Adjusted weekend hours are Saturday 9am-3pm and Sunday 1pm-4pm.

Shop Small Saturday November 25, focuses on presents for shoppers. Each time a shopper spends $10 at a participating Cameron County business they will be entered to win prizes. Shoppers can register for the event on Facebook and receive an extra ticket in the drawing. The contest will run from 9am till 2pm. The drawings will take place at 2:30pm at the Cameron County Chamber of Commerce and Artisan Center. The prizes will be donated by those participating businesses. This year the chamber challenges shoppers. ‘Can’ you kick the box store habit? The prizes will be kept sealed in tin cans. The lucky winners will be given a choice of the cans and a can opener!

A Blossburg woman has been cited for failing to confine her dog. State police at Mansfield allege a dog belonging to Kimberly Boyce got loose and went onto the property of her neighbor Michael Klemick of Cogan Station this past Sunday.

Coudersport based state police did not release the suspect’s name by report DUI charges are pending against a 19 year old Coudersport resident . Troopers claim when they pulled the woman over in Portage Township Monday evening for speeding, they discovered she was driving under the influence of a controlled substance.

A Florida man has been arrested by state police in Mansfield for DUI. Harry Knight of Panasoffke was cited after being pulled over at the intersection ofRoute 287 and the Bradshaw Road in Tioga, just before midnight September 22.