Tuesday February 18, 2020

Black Forest Express

Photo by Gerri Miller

Monday’s high, 40; Overnight low 32

TUE-RAIN, HIGH 42

TUE NIGHT-RAIN TAPERS OFF, LOW 36

WED-MOSTLY CLOUDY, HIGH 31

WED NIGHT-CLEARING, LOW 26

THU-CLEAR, HIGH 24

THU NIGHT CLEAR, LOW 16

To hear today’s podcast, click on start button below:

Obituary: Jack Fowler, Austin

Litter study underway….Elderly Wilcox woman harassment victim…..Car/deer collision investigated in Tioga County….Mansfield state police arrest two for DUI…..Burglary at home of elderly Ridgway woman investigated….

To hear today’s podcast, click on start button below:

Monday’s high, 40; Overnight low 32

TUE-RAIN, HIGH 42

TUE NIGHT-RAIN TAPERS OFF, LOW 36

WED-MOSTLY CLOUDY, HIGH 31

WED NIGHT-CLEARING, LOW 26

THU-CLEAR, HIGH 24

THU NIGHT CLEAR, LOW 16

 

The Department of Environmental Protection (DEP), Department of Transportation (PennDOT), and Keep Pennsylvania Beautiful have released the results of the first statewide comprehensive research on litter, the cost of cleaning it up, and attitudes toward litter and announced the formation of a state-led workgroup to shift Pennsylvania’s strategy from cleanup to prevention.Field research results indicate more than 502 million pieces of litter on Pennsylvania’s roads. The most common items are cigarette butts (37 percent) and plastics (30 percent), with plastic film and beverage containers most prevalent. There are an estimated 29.3 million beverage containers alone on the roads. Motorists and pedestrians are leading sources of litter, followed by improperly secured truck loads.Cities collectively spend over $68 million annually on cleanup, education, enforcement, and prevention efforts related to litter and illegal dumping, according to a related study of nine cities statewide commissioned by Keep Pennsylvania Beautiful. Eighty percent of costs go specifically to cleanup, with Philadelphia spending more than $36 million; Pittsburgh and Allentown spending more than $2 million; Harrisburg, Lancaster, and Reading spending over $1 million; and Altoona, Erie, and Scranton spending hundreds of thousands of dollars each year.PennDOT spends upwards of $13 million per year on staff and resources to pick up litter along state-owned roadways .In a phone survey to gauge Pennsylvanians’ attitudes toward litter, about 83 percent of respondents said they see educational messaging focused on litter prevention only occasionally or rarely. About 76 percent said littering reduces property values, negatively affects tourism and business, raises taxes due to cleanup, ends up in waterways, and is an environmental problem. About half of respondents said people litter because they don’t care or there’s no conveniently placed trash can. The Pennsylvania Litter Research Study was conducted in 2018-2019 with funding from DEP, PennDOT, Keep America Beautiful, and Keep Pennsylvania Beautiful. It included on-the-ground litter counts in 180 locations statewide, a random phone survey of 500 residents, and a forum where 120 community, business, and government leaders shared their views on litter impacts and what should be done to end littering. DEP, PennDOT, and Keep Pennsylvania Beautiful will form a workgroup of state government agencies, local governments, and industry and community leaders to use the research results to develop and carry out a plan of actions to reduce littering in Pennsylvania. The goal is to build the action plan around four behavior change strategies, including infrastructure, such as waste and recycling facilities and trash cans; public and school-based education; laws and ordinances; and incentives and enforcement.Learn more about the state litter research results and littering reduction initiative at www.dep.pa.gov/litteringactionplan. Keep Pennsylvania Beautiful, DEP, and PennDOT have partnered for 15 years on an annual Pick Up Pennsylvania campaign. Many thousands of Pennsylvanians have volunteered in these local community projects, removing millions of pounds of trash.

Without providing details, state police at Ridgway report they investigated a physical harassment occurring Saturday afernoo on Marvin Street in Jones Township. Am 83 year old Wilcox woman is said to be the victim when two women became involved in a domestic violence episode.

A Tioga Pa woman escaped injury last Thursday in Rutland Township when her car hit a deer. CourtneyBarga was going north on Route 549 a few minutes after 6:00 am when her Honda HRV collided a whitetail.Barga was able to drive the car to the side of the road after impact.

Troopers at Mansfield have made a couple of DUI arrests recently. 26 year old Ashley Saxon of Coplumbia Cross Roadswas arrested after patrol officers allegedly found her passed out behind the wheel while her 2003 Chevrolet S-10 was running on S. Main Street in Richmond Township just after midnight January 25. Police claim she was under the influence of drugs.

Matthew Covine, 36 of Blossburg was arrested Saturday when he was pulled over on the North Williamson Road in Covington Township after he was allegedly found to be driving his 2017 Jeep punder the influence

Troopers at Ridgway are investigating a burglary at the home of a 76 year old Ridgway woman on School drive. According to police, items have been disappearing from her home.

Obituary

John F. “Jack” Fowler, 89, a lifetime resident of Austin, passed away Monday, February 17, 2020, at the Sweden Valley Manor, Coudersport.Jack was born on August 4, 1930 in Costello, the son of the late Carl Hartson and Eva Mae (Buchholtz) Fowler.  He married the former Alma Grace Mahon on April 24, 1948 and they celebrated 66 years of marriage until her passing on May 30, 2014.Jack was a mechanic, he retired from PennDot, Coudersport, and owned and operated J & A Auto, Austin.  Jack also worked for Central PA Construction and with the state highway system on and off through the spoil system.Jack was a member of the Austin-Costello United Methodist Church and was a 50+ year member of the Free and Accepted Masons, Arcana Lodge #580, Austin.  Jack enjoyed hunting, fishing and spending time with his children and grandchildren.  Jack is survived by two sons, John A. (Sandy) Fowler of Austin and Jeff (Betsy) Fowler of Costello; two daughters, Pamela (Tom) Glover of Costello; and Kathy Gresh of Costello; 12 grandchildren and numerous great and great great grandchildren.In addition to his parents and wife, Alma, Jack was preceded in death by a son, Victor Fowler, a son-in-law, Ronald Gresh and a brother, Carl Fowler.Friends and family are invited to pay tribute to Jack’s life on Wednesday February 19, 2020 from 10 am – 11 am at the Thomas E. Fickinger Funeral Home 210 North East Street Coudersport, with a Masonic Service to be held at 10:45 am followed by a funeral service with Rev. Todd Lamer, officiating.  Burial will be in Gilmore Cemetery, Grove Township.In lieu of flowers the family suggest memorial contributions in Jack’s name be made to the Austin Ambulance Company, PO Box 328, Austin, PA 16720.To share your fondest memories of Jack or to sign his guestbook, please visit  www.thomasfickinger.comTo send flowers to John’s family, please visit our floral section.