Tuesday July 2, 2019

Early Arrivals                                                                                                                             –Gerri Miller

Monday’s high, 78; overnight low, 54

WED-PARTLY CLOUDY, CHANCE OF THUNDERSTORMS, HIGH 84

WED NIGHT-LOW 66

THU-CLOUDS, CHANCE OF PM THUNDERSTORMS, BREEZY , HIGH 82

THU NIGHT-PARTLY CLOUDY, HIGH 85

FRI-PARTLY CLOUDY, THUNDERSTORMS HIGH 85

FRI NIGHT-THUNDERSTORMS, LOW  69

To hear today’s forecast , click on start button below:

Gov. Wolf sign’s Owlett’s bill to help dairy farmers…..Penn State researchers studying seaweed as feed supplement to reduce methane…..PennDot erects pedestrian signs near UPMC…..Johnsonburg man arrested for having large amounts of cash and drugs……

To hear today’s podcast, click on start buttons below:

Part A

Part B

Gov. Wolf has  signed into law legislation authored by state Rep. Clint Owlett (R-Tioga/Bradford/Potter), a member of the House Agriculture and Rural Affairs Committee, that will create a program to direct financial support specifically to the state’s dairy industry.

“This is my first bill as a state representative that was signed into law, and I couldn’t be more proud that it was one to help Pennsylvania farm families,” said Owlett. “The Commonwealth is home to 6,650 dairy farms, which contribute $14.7 billion in economic revenue annually and support more than 52,000 jobs; however, the dairy industry as a whole is struggling, and farms are going out of business at an alarming pace. Pennsylvania’s farmers need our help and that’s what this new law will do – help. It will help drive out financial support to strategic projects that will help stabilize and grow the industry.”

My legislation, now Act 38 of 2019, will create the Dairy Investment Program under the Commonwealth Financing Authority (CFA). The program will have specific guidelines for evaluating and approving grant applications. Under the new law the CFA would also consult with the Department of Agriculture to make sure the funding is targeted to the most appropriate projects to support the dairy industry. This fiscal year, the program will receive $5 million in the state budget to issue grants to support the state’s dairy sector.

Owlett”s bill was one of several within an agricultural package that the governor signed into law. Other new laws will ensure a quick state-level response to threats such as invasive species or disease; establish a Pennsylvania Agricultural Business Development Center to help farmers create a business plan, transition plan or succession plan; enhance youth exposure to opportunities in the agriculture industry; boost enrollment in the veteran farmer Homegrown by Heroes program; provide specialty crop block grants; and more.

“I am excited about the progress we were able to make in the first half of this session year,” said Owlett. “However, this is only the beginning; there is still much more to be done to help our state’s farmers and I’m looking forward to being on the front lines of this effort.”

Supplementing cattle feed with seaweed could result in a very significant reduction in methane belched by livestock, according to Penn State researchers, but they caution that the practice may not be a realistic strategy to battle climate change.

“Asparagopsis taxiformis— a red seaweed that grows in the tropics — in short-term studies in lactating dairy cows decreased methaneemission by 80% and had no effect on feed intake or milk yield, when fed at up to 0.5% of feed dry matter intake,” said Alexander Hristov, Distinguished Professor of Dairy Nutrition. “It looks promising, and we are continuing research.”

If it is determined that a seaweed feed supplement is viable, tomake a difference globally, the scale of production would have to be immense, Hristov noted. With nearly 1.5 billion head of cattle in the world, harvesting enough wild seaweed to add to their feed would be impossible. Even to provide it as a supplement to most of the United States’ 94 million cattleis unrealistic.

“To be used as a feed additive on a large scale, the seaweed would have to be cultivated in aquaculture operations,” he said. “Harvesting wild seaweed is not an option because soon we would deplete the oceans and cause an ecological problem.”

Still, the capability of Asparagopsis taxiformisto mitigate enteric methane as a feed supplement demands attention, said Hannah Stefenoni, the graduate student working with Hristov on the research project, who will present the research to members of the American Dairy Science Association June 23 at their annual meeting in Cincinnati, Ohio. The findings of their research were recently published online today in the Proceedings of the 2019 American Dairy Science Association Meeting.

“We know that it is effective in the short term; we don’t know if it’s effective in the long term,” Hristov explained. “The microbes in cows’ rumens can adapt to a lot of things. There is a long history of feed additives that the microbes adapt to and effectiveness disappears. Whether it is with beef or dairy cows, long-term studies are needed to see if compounds in the seaweed continue to disrupt the microbes’ ability to make methane.”

There are also questions about the stability over time of the active ingredients, bromoforms, in the seaweed. These compounds are sensitive to heat and sunlight and may lose their methane- mitigating activity with processing and storage, Hristov warned. Palatability is another question. It appears cows don’t like the taste of seaweed — when Asparagopsis was included at 0.75% of the diet, researchers observed a drop in the feed intake by the animals.

Also, the long-term effects of seaweed on animal health and reproduction and its effects on milk and meat quality need to be determined. A panel judging milk taste is part of ongoing research, Hristov said.

Cows burping — often incorrectly characterized as cows farting  — methane and contributing to climate change has been the subject of considerable derision in the U.S., conceded Hristov, who is recognized as an international leader in conducting research assessing greenhouse gas emissions from animal agriculture. It is taken seriously in other countries, he explained, because the average dairy cow belches 380 pounds of the potent greenhouse gas a year.

“But methane from animal agriculture is just 5% of the total greenhouse gases produced in the United States — much, much more comes from the energy and transportation sectors,” Hristov said. “So, I think it’s a fine line with the politics surrounding this subject. Do we want to look at this? I definitely think that we should, and if there is a way that we can reduce emissions without affecting profitability on the farm, we should pursue it.”

 

 

 

And there may be a hidden benefit, Hristov added: “It is pretty much a given” that if enteric methane emissions are decreased, there likely will be an increase in the efficiency of animal production.

Seaweed used in the Penn State research was harvested from the Atlantic Ocean in the Azores and shipped frozen from Portugal. After it arrived at the university, it was freeze-dried and ground by the researchers. Freeze drying and grinding 4 tons of seaweed for the research was “a huge undertaking,” Hristov said.

Also involved in the research at Penn State were Molly Young, research technician in animal science; Audino Melgar Moreno and Susanna Raeisaenen, graduate assistants in animal science; and CamilaLage, a graduate student at Federal University of Minas Gerais, Brazil.

The research was funded by the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Institute of Food and Agriculture, and the Jeremy and Hannelore Grantham Environmental Trust.

(PennDOT) has placed dynamic message boards on Route 6 near UPMC Cole Memorial Hospital outside of Coudersport.

 

The boards have been placed to enhance pedestrian safety. Through the summer, parking lots at the hospital will see improvement work, making it necessary for employees to park in an area along Route 6 and walk a distance to the hospital.

 

Message boards facing eastbound and westbound traffic on Route 6 are alerting drivers to the potential of pedestrians along the roadway between the hours of 6:00 A.M. and 8:00 P.M.

PennDOT also plans to place a speed minder board in the area sometime next week. The speed minder sign utilizes radar to determine the speeds of oncoming traffic.

Speeding and other aggressive driving behaviors are among the leading causes of crashes and fatalities in Pennsylvania. Aggressive driving behaviors were listed as a crash cause in 51 percent of Potter County crashes in 2017.

PennDOT reminds drivers to use caution and slowdown in pedestrian areas.

Ridgway based state police have arrested 50yearold Thomas Doan of Johnsonburg on drug possession charges. Troopers claim when they pulled over Doan’s 2009 Mercury Sable on the Wilcox Road Saturday evening for  multiple traffic violations, they determined he was driving under the influence of a controlled substance. Police also allege they found a large amount of methamphetamine, marijuana.,related drug paraphernalia and a large amount of US currency. Following arraignment before District Judge Martin, Doan was committed to the Elk County Jail in lieu of $15,000 cash bail.

 

Gov. Wolf sign’s Owlett’s bill to help dairy farmers…..Penn State researchers studying seaweed as feed supplement to reduce methane…..PennDot erects pedestrian signs near UPMC…..Johnsonburg man arrested for having large amounts of cash and drugs……

Gov. Wolf has  signed into law legislation authored by state Rep. Clint Owlett (R-Tioga/Bradford/Potter), a member of the House Agriculture and Rural Affairs Committee, that will create a program to direct financial support specifically to the state’s dairy industry.

“This is my first bill as a state representative that was signed into law, and I couldn’t be more proud that it was one to help Pennsylvania farm families,” said Owlett. “The Commonwealth is home to 6,650 dairy farms, which contribute $14.7 billion in economic revenue annually and support more than 52,000 jobs; however, the dairy industry as a whole is struggling, and farms are going out of business at an alarming pace. Pennsylvania’s farmers need our help and that’s what this new law will do – help. It will help drive out financial support to strategic projects that will help stabilize and grow the industry.”

My legislation, now Act 38 of 2019, will create the Dairy Investment Program under the Commonwealth Financing Authority (CFA). The program will have specific guidelines for evaluating and approving grant applications. Under the new law the CFA would also consult with the Department of Agriculture to make sure the funding is targeted to the most appropriate projects to support the dairy industry. This fiscal year, the program will receive $5 million in the state budget to issue grants to support the state’s dairy sector.

Owlett”s bill was one of several within an agricultural package that the governor signed into law. Other new laws will ensure a quick state-level response to threats such as invasive species or disease; establish a Pennsylvania Agricultural Business Development Center to help farmers create a business plan, transition plan or succession plan; enhance youth exposure to opportunities in the agriculture industry; boost enrollment in the veteran farmer Homegrown by Heroes program; provide specialty crop block grants; and more.

“I am excited about the progress we were able to make in the first half of this session year,” said Owlett. “However, this is only the beginning; there is still much more to be done to help our state’s farmers and I’m looking forward to being on the front lines of this effort.”

Supplementing cattle feed with seaweed could result in a very significant reduction in methane belched by livestock, according to Penn State researchers, but they caution that the practice may not be a realistic strategy to battle climate change.

“Asparagopsis taxiformis— a red seaweed that grows in the tropics — in short-term studies in lactating dairy cows decreased methaneemission by 80% and had no effect on feed intake or milk yield, when fed at up to 0.5% of feed dry matter intake,” said Alexander Hristov, Distinguished Professor of Dairy Nutrition. “It looks promising, and we are continuing research.”

If it is determined that a seaweed feed supplement is viable, tomake a difference globally, the scale of production would have to be immense, Hristov noted. With nearly 1.5 billion head of cattle in the world, harvesting enough wild seaweed to add to their feed would be impossible. Even to provide it as a supplement to most of the United States’ 94 million cattleis unrealistic.

“To be used as a feed additive on a large scale, the seaweed would have to be cultivated in aquaculture operations,” he said. “Harvesting wild seaweed is not an option because soon we would deplete the oceans and cause an ecological problem.”

Still, the capability of Asparagopsis taxiformisto mitigate enteric methane as a feed supplement demands attention, said Hannah Stefenoni, the graduate student working with Hristov on the research project, who will present the research to members of the American Dairy Science Association June 23 at their annual meeting in Cincinnati, Ohio. The findings of their research were recently published online today in the Proceedings of the 2019 American Dairy Science Association Meeting.

“We know that it is effective in the short term; we don’t know if it’s effective in the long term,” Hristov explained. “The microbes in cows’ rumens can adapt to a lot of things. There is a long history of feed additives that the microbes adapt to and effectiveness disappears. Whether it is with beef or dairy cows, long-term studies are needed to see if compounds in the seaweed continue to disrupt the microbes’ ability to make methane.”

There are also questions about the stability over time of the active ingredients, bromoforms, in the seaweed. These compounds are sensitive to heat and sunlight and may lose their methane- mitigating activity with processing and storage, Hristov warned. Palatability is another question. It appears cows don’t like the taste of seaweed — when Asparagopsis was included at 0.75% of the diet, researchers observed a drop in the feed intake by the animals.

Also, the long-term effects of seaweed on animal health and reproduction and its effects on milk and meat quality need to be determined. A panel judging milk taste is part of ongoing research, Hristov said.

Cows burping — often incorrectly characterized as cows farting  — methane and contributing to climate change has been the subject of considerable derision in the U.S., conceded Hristov, who is recognized as an international leader in conducting research assessing greenhouse gas emissions from animal agriculture. It is taken seriously in other countries, he explained, because the average dairy cow belches 380 pounds of the potent greenhouse gas a year.

“But methane from animal agriculture is just 5% of the total greenhouse gases produced in the United States — much, much more comes from the energy and transportation sectors,” Hristov said. “So, I think it’s a fine line with the politics surrounding this subject. Do we want to look at this? I definitely think that we should, and if there is a way that we can reduce emissions without affecting profitability on the farm, we should pursue it.”

 

 

 

And there may be a hidden benefit, Hristov added: “It is pretty much a given” that if enteric methane emissions are decreased, there likely will be an increase in the efficiency of animal production.

Seaweed used in the Penn State research was harvested from the Atlantic Ocean in the Azores and shipped frozen from Portugal. After it arrived at the university, it was freeze-dried and ground by the researchers. Freeze drying and grinding 4 tons of seaweed for the research was “a huge undertaking,” Hristov said.

Also involved in the research at Penn State were Molly Young, research technician in animal science; Audino Melgar Moreno and Susanna Raeisaenen, graduate assistants in animal science; and CamilaLage, a graduate student at Federal University of Minas Gerais, Brazil.

The research was funded by the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Institute of Food and Agriculture, and the Jeremy and Hannelore Grantham Environmental Trust.

(PennDOT) has placed dynamic message boards on Route 6 near UPMC Cole Memorial Hospital outside of Coudersport.

 

The boards have been placed to enhance pedestrian safety. Through the summer, parking lots at the hospital will see improvement work, making it necessary for employees to park in an area along Route 6 and walk a distance to the hospital.

 

Message boards facing eastbound and westbound traffic on Route 6 are alerting drivers to the potential of pedestrians along the roadway between the hours of 6:00 A.M. and 8:00 P.M.

PennDOT also plans to place a speed minder board in the area sometime next week. The speed minder sign utilizes radar to determine the speeds of oncoming traffic.

Speeding and other aggressive driving behaviors are among the leading causes of crashes and fatalities in Pennsylvania. Aggressive driving behaviors were listed as a crash cause in 51 percent of Potter County crashes in 2017.

PennDOT reminds drivers to use caution and slowdown in pedestrian areas.

Ridgway based state police have arrested 50yearold Thomas Doan of Johnsonburg on drug possession charges. Troopers claim when they pulled over Doan’s 2009 Mercury Sable on the Wilcox Road Saturday evening for  multiple traffic violations, they determined he was driving under the influence of a controlled substance. Police also allege they found a large amount of methamphetamine, marijuana.,related drug paraphernalia and a large amount of US currency. Following arraignment before District Judge Martin, Doan was committed to the Elk County Jail in lieu of $15,000 cash bail.