Thursday July 19, 2018

 

 

        

   Photo by Gerri Miller

Tuesday’s high, 80; Overnight low, 44; no rain
THU– SHUNNY, HIGH 74
THU NIGHT-CLEAR, LOW 63
FRI-MOSTLY CLOUDY, BREEZY, HIGH 77
FRI NIGHT-CLOUDY,POSSIBLE ISOLATED THUNDERSTORMS, LOW 61
SAT-MOSTLY CLOUDY, HIGH 70
SAT NIGHT -LATE EVENING SHOWERS POSSIBLE, LOW 62

To hear today’s complete forecast, click on arrow below:

 

Pennsylvania is taking steps to slow invasion of spotted lanternfly…PSU names faculty to help with the effort…..Coudersport Free Methodist Church changes name and moves into new building……Coudy rocks part of Eliot Ness Fest…..Mt. Jewett man arrested on drug and PFA violation charges…..

As if we don’t have enough to worry about. Pennsylvania is gearing up to battle an invasive insect, the Spotted Lanternfly.
The Spotted Lanternfly, Lycormadelicatula (White), an invasive plant hopper, has been discovered in Berks County, Pennsylvania. It is native to China, India, Vietnam, and introduced to Korea where it has become a major pest. This insect has the potential to greatly impact the grape, hops and logging industries. Early detection is vital for the protection of Pennsylvania businesses and agriculture.
If you live outside of the current (quarantine area) in Pennsylvania and find a spotted lanternfly, report it! Use this interactive Plant Pest Quarantine SearchOpens In A New Window to see if you’re in the spotted lanternfly quarantine area.

Identification:
The Spotted Lanternfly adult is approximately 1” long and 1/2” wide at rest. The forewing is grey with black spots and the wings tips are reticulated black blocks outlined in grey. The hind wings have contrasting patches of red and black with a white band. The legs and head are black; the abdomen is yellow with broad black bands. Immature stages are black with white spots, and develop red patches as they grow.

Signs & Symptoms:
Trees, such as tree of heaven and willow, will develop weeping wounds. These wounds will leave a greyish or black trail along the trunk. This sap will attract other insects to feed, notably wasps and ants. In late fall, adults will lay egg masses on host trees and nearby smooth surfaces like stone, outdoor furniture, vehicles, and structures. Newly laid egg masses have a grey mud-like covering which can take on a dry cracked appearance over time. Old egg masses appear as rows of 30-50 brownish seed-like deposits in 4-7 columns on the trunk, roughly an inch long.

What to do:
If you see egg masses, scrape them off, double bag them and throw them away. You can also place the eggs into alcohol or hand sanitizer to kill them. Please report all destroyed egg masses on our website.
Collect a specimen: Specimens of any life stage can be turned in to the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture’s Entomology lab for verification. Submit samples with the Entomology Program Sample Submission Form.
Take a picture: A photograph of any life stage (including egg masses) can be submitted to Badbug@pa.gov.

Report a site: If you can’t take a specimen or photograph, call the Automated Invasive Species Report Line at 1-888-4BAD-FLY (1-888-422-3359)and leave a message detailing your sighting and contact information.
As part of the partnership with the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture and USDA, the Penn State Extension spotted lanternfly website is the primary hub for educational and management information. Extension also is working with the state to create online training to assist businesses in meeting quarantine permitting requirements and is staffing a spotted lanternfly toll-free hotline. In addition, College of Agricultural Sciences researchers are leading efforts to learn more about the insect’s biology and control options.

Penn State researchers and extension personnel are working closely with state and federal officials to develop strategies to contain and control the spotted lanternfly, which threatens agricultural sectors worth about $18 billion to Pennsylvania’s economy. Scientists are racing to learn more about the pest’s biology and behavior, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture awarded Penn State a $1.2 million grant to lead outreach and communication efforts across the state.
As populations of spotted lanternfly grow and spread, management of this insect likely will increase in complexity and intensity over the next few years, according to Rick Roush, dean of the College of Agricultural Sciences.

As part of the partnership with the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture and USDA, the Penn State Extension spotted lanternfly website is the primary hub for educational and management information. Extension also is working with the state to create online training to assist businesses in meeting quarantine permitting requirements and is staffing a spotted lanternfly toll-free hotline. In addition, College of Agricultural Sciences researchers are leading efforts to learn more about the insect’s biology and control options.
Dennis Calvin, director of Penn State Extension and associate dean in the College of Agricultural Sciences since 2009, has assumed a new role overseeing the college’s efforts to combat the invasive spotted lanternfly. His appointment, which comes with the title of associate dean and director of special programs, was effective July 1.With Calvin’s shift in responsibilities, Jeff Hyde, Penn State Extension associate director for programs, will serve as acting director of extension.

Roush noted that Calvin is uniquely qualified to serve in this role due to his background and long-standing reputation in multiple facets of entomology and extension. “Because of his efforts to position Penn State as a national leader in extension, Dr. Calvin is well known and highly regarded among universities and government agencies in neighboring states, which will be critical as we coordinate with them on matters such as trade and interstate transport.”

Calvin joined the faculty of Penn State’s entomology department in 1985. For 11 years, he led Penn State’s integrated pest management, or IPM, program, which entailed developing and coordinating IPM initiatives and acting as a liaison with national, regional and state IPM groups.

His research has focused on modeling insect population dynamics and the effect that climatic uncertainty across the landscape plays in their management. He has developed expert systems and other computer-based decision-support systems for insect pest management in corn and alfalfa and trained county-based extension educators, private consultants, farmers and agribusiness personnel in pest management for field and forage crops and stored products.
He received a bachelor’s degree in agronomy and pest management from Iowa State University, and he earned his master’s and doctoral degrees in entomology from Kansas State University.

Hyde, a professor of agricultural economics, has developed and delivered extension educational programs on topics such as farm business planning, marketing and human resource management. From 2008 to 2015, he led Penn State Extension’s statewide ag entrepreneurship and economic/community development programs.
Before becoming associate director for programs — and then assuming the acting extension director position — Hyde served as associate head of the college’s Department of Agricultural Economics, Sociology, and Education and as assistant to the director for special program initiatives for Penn State Extension. He earned a bachelor’s degree from Frostburg (Md.) State University and master’s and doctoral degrees in agricultural economics from Purdue University.

The Coudersport Free Methodist Church is now GOD’S COUNTRY MINISTRIES.Sunday, July 22, 10 a.m. will be our 1st worship service in our new facility at 1237 E. 2nd Street, Coudersport (3 miles East of Coudersport on Route 6.)After 118 years of ministry centered at 507 S. Main St., we are moving into God’s future for our church family with a new name. Thank you to all who have prayed, worked, and encouraged us along the way. We look forward to an amazing future of serving Jesus by serving our community. On Sunday, Sept. 16 we plan to have our great Grand Opening celebration.

Coudy Rocks! 5 prize rocks have been hidden in Eliot Ness-relevant locations in downtown Coudersport. These rocks can be turned in at the inflatable bounce houses (lawn of the Park Methodist Church) on Friday and/or Saturday for free access to the inflatables all weekend (Friday 12p-8p and Saturday 9a-8p). Thank you to Lisa Bretz for painting these awesome rocks! #eliotnessfest #coudyrocks

There are still great places to stay within 25 miles of the Eliot Ness Fest – check them all out at the link below. Some specific mentions: The Laurelwood Inn (2 miles); Five Pines Lodge (3 miles); Susquehannock Lodge (13 miles) Oak Hall Bed and Breakfast (15 miles); Deering Run Bed & Breakfast (18 miles); Kettle Creek Adventures (25 miles). https://visitpottertioga.com/stay/… Window in the woods and Gobbler Hill properties.

A Mt. Jewett man was arrested late last night by Kane based state police for drug possession. Troopers explained that they were called to a home at 8Center Street in that town for a possible domestic violence incident in progress. When they arrived ,officers found 32 year old Ryan McClellan was trying to move his items of the residence in order to leave. While speaking with them they discovered he was in had a firearm and was thus in direct violation of a PFA issued by the City of Jamestown, NY. A search was conducted and a small blue and green glass pipe was found in McClelland’s left pants pocket .A backpack also held an unmarked pill bottle containing a green leafy substance that looked like pot. McClellan was arrested for possession of a small amount of marijuana, and possession of drug paraphernalia as well as violating a Protection from Abuse order.