Tuesday November 28, 2017

 

2017 Thanksgiving sunset

Monday’s high, 34; Overnight low,21; no precipitation
TUE-SUNNY, HIGH 54
TUE NIGHT-LOW 40
WED-MOSTLY SUNNY START, THEN CLOUDS INCREASE HIGH 45
WED NIGHT– LOW 30
THU-PARTLY CLOUDY, CLOUDS INCREASE,, HIGH 48
THU NIGHT-CHANCE OF RAIN, LOW 33

To hear today’s forecast, click on arrow below.

BFB Headlines (Tuesday November 28, 2017)_An Austin man jailed for terroristic threats has also been charged with harassment…..No injuries reported following deer collision in Elk County…..Water truck driver escapes injury in vehicle fire near Roulette….Tioga County man arrested on drug charges after overdose…..Hunters encouraged to share their harvest…Penn State Extension offering courses through new website….Next on-air report after 10:06 am today on www.blackkforestbroadcasting.com

Obituary: Earl Wilber, Smethport

To hear today’s podcast, click on arrow below.

An Austin man who was jailed on a terroristic threat charge has been subsequently charged with harassment for an incident allegedly occurring the night before. State police allege 56 year old Michael Majot threatened to kill a 57 year old Austin woman and a 34 year old Florence, MS woman during a phone call to the victim’s home on Thanksgiving Day. Majot was committed to the Potter County Jail in lieu of $10,000 secured bail after being arraigned before on-call District Judge Delores Weiss. Now, troopers allege Majot subjected 57 year old Kelly Majot to unwanted physical contact at around 11:00 pm Wednesday night at her home on North Ruth Street, Austin.

A Johnstown driver escaped injury in a car/deer collision Monday evening in Horton Township, Elk County., State police at Ridgway report Patrick Wess was going south on Route 219 when the white tail ran onto the road in front of his Chevrolet Silverado. Wess was unable to avoid impact and the truck had to be towed from the scene. However, he was using a seatbelt and was not hurt.

Coudersport based state police say a  truck driver, whose name was not released, escaped injury in a vehicle fire Monday afternoon on Route 6 in Roulette Township. The water tanker was headed west just west of the Reed Run Road when the operator noticed smoke coming from the right front wheel. He pulled the rig to the berm and shut the engine off. He was able to make repairs and drove from the scene. Since there were no injuries and the truck could be driven away, it was technically a “non-reportable.”

However, troopers have not yet released details about a collision Sunday evening near the intersection of West Main Street and Route 6 in Roulette Township. Injuries were reported. Roulette volunteer emergency services responded to the scene.

Mansfield based state police have arrested a 26 year old Middlebury Center man for violating drug laws. The charges came after authorities responded to an overdose at a home on Route 249 November 12 and seized drug paraphernalia which was allegedly in plain view. Dakota Kohler was taken to a hospital for treatment.

Pennsylvania’s rifle deer season is in its second day and successful hunters are encouraged to help share their harvest.
Each year, the generosity of Pennsylvania’s hunters results in about 200,000 meals for the state’s hungry. By donating venison through Hunters Sharing the Harvest – a program that works through a network of meat processors to channel venison donations to local food banks, soup kitchens and hungry families – hunters extend their helping hands to those in need.
And, once again this year, the Pennsylvania Game Commission and other partners are making it easy for hunters to help out. The Game Commission again donated $20,000 to the program – money that enables Hunters Sharing the Harvest to accept venison donations without charging hunters. In prior years, hunters who donated venison needed also to pay a $15 tax-deductiblefee to cover deer-processing costs.
. All deer donated through Hunters Sharing the Harvest must be processed professionally by a participating butcher. For information on where to take deer to be donated, or to learn more about the program generally, visit Hunters Sharing the Harvest’s website, www.sharedeer.org.

It’s still officially fall even though we’ve had some winter weather but if you are already thinking of spring, you might be interested in starting fruit orchard.
Professionals or individuals interested in joining the fruit growing industry who want to learn about orchard management on their own schedule now have the opportunity to take an online course offered by Penn State Extension.
Orchard Management: Site Planning and Preparation is designed for beginning growers interested in understanding the details of choosing an orchard site and preparing to plant. The three sections cover tree fruit requirements, site evaluation and preparing the orchard site.
Participants who successfully complete the course will be able to identify the moisture, heat and climate requirements for growing tree fruit; determine soil characteristics of sites that allow fruit trees to thrive; identify the desirable physical characteristics of a site; understand the impact of slope and aspect; understand when a site can be improved and when it cannot; decide on what species to plant; plan orchard layout; and determine what needs to be done two years before planting, one year before planting and the year of planting.
Those interested in the course can view details and sign up at https://extension.psu.edu/orchard-management-site-planning-and-preparation.
A variety of online non-credit courses for the public have recently been unveiled on Penn State Extension’s new website, which provides a wealth of educational experiences and resources for the professionals and community members served by extension. The new web experience allows consumers to access educational articles, videos, online courses and publications at their convenience, and register for regional in-person workshops and online webinars on a variety of subjects.

 

 

Pennsylvania’s rifle deer season is in its second day and successful hunters are encouraged to help share their harvest.
Each year, the generosity of Pennsylvania’s hunters results in about 200,000 meals for the state’s hungry. By donating venison through Hunters Sharing the Harvest – a program that works through a network of meat processors to channel venison donations to local food banks, soup kitchens and hungry families – hunters extend their helping hands to those in need.
And, once again this year, the Pennsylvania Game Commission and other partners are making it easy for hunters to help out. The Game Commission again donated $20,000 to the program – money that enables Hunters Sharing the Harvest to accept venison donations without charging hunters. In prior years, hunters who donated venison needed also to pay a $15 tax-deductiblefee to cover deer-processing costs.
All deer donated through Hunters Sharing the Harvest must be processed professionally by a participating butcher. For information on where to take deer to be donated, or to learn more about the program generally, visit Hunters Sharing the Harvest’s website, www.sharedeer.org.

It’s still officially fall even though we’ve had some winter weather but if you are already thinking of spring, you might be interested in starting fruit orchard.
Professionals or individuals interested in joining the fruit growing industry who want to learn about orchard management on their own schedule now have the opportunity to take an online course offered by Penn State Extension.
Orchard Management: Site Planning and Preparation is designed for beginning growers interested in understanding the details of choosing an orchard site and preparing to plant. The three sections cover tree fruit requirements, site evaluation and preparing the orchard site.
Participants who successfully complete the course will be able to identify the moisture, heat and climate requirements for growing tree fruit; determine soil characteristics of sites that allow fruit trees to thrive; identify the desirable physical characteristics of a site; understand the impact of slope and aspect; understand when a site can be improved and when it cannot; decide on what species to plant; plan orchard layout; and determine what needs to be done two years before planting, one year before planting and the year of planting.
Those interested in the course can view details and sign up at https://extension.psu.edu/orchard-management-site-planning-and-preparation.
A variety of online non-credit courses for the public have recently been unveiled on Penn State Extension’s new website, which provides a wealth of educational experiences and resources for the professionals and community members served by extension. The new web experience allows consumers to access educational articles, videos, online courses and publications at their convenience, and register for regional in-person workshops and online webinars on a variety of subjects.

                                                                                    Obituary

 Earl E. Wilber, 75, of Route 46,Smethport,  passed away at home on Friday (Nov. 24, 2017) surrounded by his family and his beloved dog “Skippy,” following a long and courageous battle with cancer.
Born June 18, 1942, in Olean, N.Y., he was a son of Harry and Esther Saverline Wilber. He was a graduate of the Otto-Eldred High School, Class of 1961. He married Mary E. Cochran Billyard, who survives.
He was employed by the American Refining Group in Bradford, which was formerly known as Kendall Refinery and Witco Refinery, for over 33 years prior to retiring in 2002 due to health issues.
He was a lifetime member of the Veterans of Foreign Wars
Post 2497 of Smethport and a member of the VFW Post 212 of Bradford; as well as the Fraternal Order of Eagles # 2432 of Bradford and the Limestone, NY, Fireman’s Club.
Since his retirement he has greatly enjoyed hunting and riding his four-wheeler with his best friend, Dick Collins of Rixford. He enjoyed spending time with his friends and going anywhere with his beloved dog, “Skippy.”
In addition to his wife he is survived by three sons, William T. (Tiffany) Wilber in Florida, Timothy E. (Leianne) Wilber of Smethport and Kristopher A. (Malia) Wilber of Bailey, Colo.; three daughters, Cammy McGhee of Erie, Dianna Billyard of South Orange, N.J., and Sheryl Wilber of Machias, N.Y.; 10 grandchildren, Hunter Wilber, Austin and Colby Wilber, Jessica Hunt, Wayne and Michael Fagan, Chelsey Wilber, Kenneth Cheizewiczs, Chesney, Chelsey and Sara Wilber; several great-grandchildren; two sisters, Anna Mae (Mick) McMurtrie of Bradford and Cyndie Perry in Virginia; and two brothers, Del (Judy) Wilber in Florida and Roy (Nancy) Wilber of Bradford; as well as many nieces and nephews.
In addition to his parents he was preceded in death by his son, Daniel Wilber; a grandson, Keith Alan McGhee; and a granddaughter, Janda Hunt; as well as three brothers, Jerry, Bill and Jim Wilber.
At Earl’s request there will be no visitation; a celebration of Earl’s life will be held at a later date and time to be announced.
Memorial contributions may be made to a charity of the donor’s choice.