Friday, November 29, 2019

Black Forest Express 

Photo by Gerri Miller

Thursday’s high, 55; Overnight low, 26

FRI-MOSTLY SUNNY, HIGH 45

FRI NIGHT-SNOW MIXING WITH RAIN, LOW 33

SAT-RAIN, HIGH 56

SAT NIGHT-RAIN CHANGING TO SNOW, LOW 33

SUN-SNOW TAPERS OFF. HIGH 39

SUN NIGHT LOW 26

To hear the complete weekend forecast, click on start button below:

 Hunters took almost 1500 bears in 52 counties during first three days of season…Pennsylvania’s general deer hunting season begins tomorrow…two drivers arrested for Driving under the influence of drugs…Minor car/deer collision investigated in McKean County…

To hear  today’s podcast, click on start buttons below:

Part A:

Part B:

Through three days of Pennsylvania’s general bear season, hunters have harvested 1,498 bears, with bears taken in 52 counties.That compares to a three-day 1,833 in the 2018 general season. However, the 2019 general season harvest is complemented by a large bear harvest during new and expanded early bear seasons for muzzleloader, firearms and archery hunters. Factoring in the early season harvest, 3,373 bears have been taken through Tuesday. That already tops the 2018 total bear harvest of 3,153, with plenty more bear hunting still to go.After the season’s third day, two bears of more than 600 pounds have been added to the list.A 743-pound bear taken Tuesday morning with a rifle in Greene Township, Pike County, by Matthew J. Erdie Jr., of Nazareth, ranks as the third-heaviest bear taken across all 2019 bear seasons.Meanwhile, a 661-pounder taken Monday morning with a rifle in Lake Township, Wayne County, by Michael A. Biduck II, of West Abington, now ranks as the fifth-heaviest bear in 2019.The largest bear through all 2019 seasons continues to be the 813-pound male taken with a rifle on the opening day of the general season in Smithfield Township, Monroe County, by Victor M. Vassalluzzo, of Kintnersville.The heaviest bear ever taken in Pennsylvania was an 875-pounder harvested in 2010 in Middle Smithfield Township, Pike County. Since 1992, seven black bears weighing at least 800 pounds have been lawfully harvested in Pennsylvania hunting seasons.Other large bears taken in the 2019 general season’s first three days – all taken with a rifle – include: a 747-pound male taken in Wright Township, Luzerne County, by J. Kripp Jr., of Mountaintop; a 696-pound male taken in Penn Forest Township, Carbon County, by Brian J. Borosh, of Jim Thorpe; a 657-pound male taken in Franklin Township, Columbia County, by Nicholas A. Podgurski, of Elysburg; a 656-pound male taken in Hanover Township, Luzerne County, by Dale J. Kobal, of Hunlock Creek; a 623-pound male taken in Beech Creek Township, Clinton County, by Mikael J. Catanese, of Sewickley; a 620-pound male taken in Miles Township, Centre County, by Reuben Kennel, of Turbotville; and a 604-pound male taken in Gallagher Township, Clinton County, by Steven Z. Rohrbach, of Lock Haven.The top bear-hunting county in the state over the general season’s first three days was Lycoming County with 113 bears. It was followed by Tioga County with 107 bears.

Three-day preliminary harvests by county and region are:

The preliminary three-day bear harvest by Wildlife Management Unit was as follows: WMU 1A, 11 (17 in 2018); WMU 1B, 44 (100); WMU 2A, 3 (5); WMU 2C, 69 (115); WMU 2D, 92 (114); WMU 2E, 38 (56); WMU 2F, 170 (198); WMU 2G, 309 (344); WMU 2H, 49 (59); WMU 3A, 85 (99); WMU 3B, 138 (117); WMU 3C, 56 (45); WMU 3D, 161 (141); WMU 4A, 76 (123); WMU 4B, 32 (53); WMU 4C, 50 (83); WMU 4D, 92 (112); WMU 4E, 21 (48); WMU 5A, 1 (4); WMU 5C, 1 (0).

Three-day harvests by county and region are:

Northwest (221): Warren, 61 (52); Clarion, 35 (37); Venango, 30 (68); Forest, 26 (52); Jefferson, 25 (64); Butler, 20 (17); Crawford, 19 (49); Mercer, 4 (12); and Erie, 1 (15).

 

Southwest (114): Somerset, 34 (57); Armstrong, 30 (25); Indiana, 24 (30); Fayette, 14 (32); Cambria, 7 (13); Westmoreland, 4 (11); and Greene, 1 (0).

Northcentral (626): Lycoming, 113 (103); Tioga, 107 (86); Clinton, 87 (119); Potter, 76 (54); McKean, 59 (43); Clearfield, 53 (72); Elk, 51 (46); Centre, 35 (46); Cameron, 30 (61); and Union, 15 (13).

Southcentral (154): Huntingdon, 49 (76); Bedford, 34 (51); Fulton, 17 (33); Perry, 16 (14); Blair, 15 (21); Juniata, 8 (15); Mifflin, 6 (10); Franklin, 5 (14); Cumberland, 3 (4); and Adams, 1 (4).

Northeast (349): Pike, 66 (46); Monroe, 44 (46); Luzerne, 39 (50); Bradford, 36 (46); Wayne, 35 (29); Sullivan, 30 (30); Susquehanna, 29 (10); Wyoming, 19 (24); Lackawanna, 18 (15); Carbon, 16 (25); Columbia, 12 (17); and Northumberland, 5 (17).

Southeast (34): Dauphin, 14 (25); Schuylkill, 13 (17); Berks 6 (1); and Lebanon, 1 (7).

Saturday’s opener for the firearms deer season and the possibility of more older bucks throughout the Commonwealth could mean a record harvest. Last year’s firearms deer season saw rainy weather nearly statewide throughout much of the opening day. But even then, 30 percent of the antlered deer harvested in the 2018-19 firearms season were taken on opening day. It was the best day of the season for buck harvest.

It’s likely that opening day will continue to be the best for buck harvest this year, when the season will open on a Saturday

And there now is a third Saturday in the season, as well, since the season was expanded from 12 days to 13 to accommodate a Saturday opener in which more hunters likely will be able to participate.

Pennsylvania’s firearms season historically has drawn the biggest crowds of all hunting seasons and consequently has been the state’s principal deer-management tool for more than a century. Its coming preoccupies many Pennsylvanians through their Thanksgiving meals and sends many more to a variety of outlets to fill their last-minute needs.

Deer hunters had seen the statewide buck harvest increase for three consecutive years until last season’s opening day soaker ruined the streak. But given the carryover of older bucks from last season, there’s no reason a new streak can’t start now Larger-racked – and older – bucks are making up more of the deer harvest with each passing year. Two seasons ago, 163,750 bucks were taken by hunters, making it the second-largest buck harvest in Pennsylvania since antler restrictions were started in 2002. It was the 10th best all-time.

In the 2018-19 hunting seasons the overall deer harvest was 374,690 – 226,940 antlerless deer and 147,750 bucks. But despite the decreased buck harvest in 2018-19 seasons, there were more 2½-year-old and older bucks – 64 percent. Over the previous four years, the percentage of 2½-year-old and older bucks in the annual deer harvest was: 2017, 57 percent; 2016, 56; 2015, 59; and 2014, 57.

The statewide general firearms season runs from Nov. 30 to Dec. 14. In most areas, hunters may take only antlered deer during the season’s first six days, with the antlerless and antlered seasons then running concurrently from the first Saturday, Dec. 7, to the season’s close. In WMUs 2B, 5C and 5D, however, properly licensed hunters may take either antlered or antlerless deer at any time during the season.

Rules regarding the number of points a legal buck must have on one antler also vary in different parts of the state, and young hunters statewide follow separate guidelines.

For a complete breakdown of antler restrictions, WMU boundaries and other regulations, consult the 2019-20 Pennsylvania Hunting & Trapping Digest, which is available online at the Game Commission’s website, www.pgc.pa.gov.

Hunters statewide must wear at all times a minimum of 250 square inches of fluorescent orange material on their head, chest and back combined. An orange hat and vest will satisfy the requirement. Nonhunters who might be afield during the deer season and other hunting seasons are asked to consider wearing orange, as well.

The statewide general firearms season runs from Nov. 30 to Dec. 14. In most areas, hunters may take only antlered deer during the season’s first six days, with the antlerless and antlered seasons then running concurrently from the first Saturday, Dec. 7, to the season’s close. In WMUs 2B, 5C and 5D, however, properly licensed hunters may take either antlered or antlerless deer at any time during the season.

Rules regarding the number of points a legal buck must have on one antler also vary in different parts of the state, and young hunters statewide follow separate guidelines.

For a complete breakdown of antler restrictions, WMU boundaries and other regulations, consult the 2019-20 Pennsylvania Hunting & Trapping Digest, which is available online at the Game Commission’s website, www.pgc.pa.gov.

Hunters statewide must wear at all times a minimum of 250 square inches of fluorescent orange material on their head, chest and back combined. An orange hat and vest will satisfy the requirement. Nonhunters who might be afield during the deer season and other hunting seasons are asked to consider wearing orange, as well.

A valid tag must be affixed to the ear of each deer harvested before that deer is moved. The tag must be filled out with a ball-point pen by the hunter.

Within 10 days of a harvest, a successful hunter is required to make a report to the Game Commission. Harvests can be reported online at the Game Commission’s website – www.pgc.pa.gov – by clicking on the “Report a Harvest” button on the home page. Reporting online not only is the quickest way to report a harvest, it’s the most cost-effective for the Game Commission.Harvests also can be reported by mailing in the postage-paid cards that are provided when licenses are purchased, or successful hunters can call 1-855-PAHUNT1 (1-855-724-8681) to report by phone. Those reporting by phone are asked to have their license number and other information about the harvest ready at the time they call.

Mentored youth hunters are required to report deer harvests within five days. And hunters with DMAP permits must report on their hunting success, regardless of whether they harvest deer.

State police at Lewis Run have arrested two motorists for driving under the influence of drugs. A 36 year old Duke Center man was arrested after police responded to a disturbance involving a boyfriend and girlfriend on Main Street in Otto Township late Wednesday night. Police claim when they searched the male suspect, they found two smoking pipes containing burnt pot in his pocket. A 42 year old Great Valley, NY man was arrested a few hours later, early Thursday morning after being stopped for a traffic violation on the West Eldred Road in Eldred Township. Police did not release the names of the suspects.

The name of a driver whose car hit a deer Wednesday afternoon on South Avenue in Bradford Township.has also not been releasled.  State police at Lewis Run say a 2013 Ford Fusion was going north when it encountered a whitetail. The driver could not avoid the collision but since there were no human injuries and the car could be driven from the scene, the accident is considered a “non-reportable.”

 

Wednesday November 27, 2019

Tuesday’s high, 52; Overnight low, 45

WED-MOSTLY SUNNY, HIGH 55

WED NIGHT-CLOUDY, CHANCE OF RAIN, WINDY LOW 47

THANKSGIVING-SCATTERED RAIN SHOWERS, HIGH 56

THU NIGHT-CHANCE OF RAIN MIXING WITH SNOW, LOW 33

FRI-MOSTLY SUNNY, CHANCE OF A SHOWER HIGH 39

FRI NIGHT-PARTLY CLOUDY, LOW 26

To hear today’s complete forecast, click on start button below:

Unemployment went up in all five counties in the Black Forest Service Area last month….more than 1300 bears taken in first two days of four day season…PennDot offers resources for holiday travel….

To hear today’s podcast, click on start buttons below:

Part A:

Part B:

Unemployment increased between September and October in all five counties served by Black Forest Broadcasting. The jobless rate went up a whole percentage point from  5.2% to 6.2% in Potter County. McKean County saw an increase from 5.1% to 5.7%; Cameron which had the highest in Pennsylvania went up from 5.1% to 8.7%; Tioga’s rate increased from 5.0% to 5.5% and Elk’s went up from4.5% to 5.9%. Pennsylvania’s percentage was 4.2% while the national figure remained historically low at 3.6%

After two days, 1,330 black bears have been harvested as part of Pennsylvania’s statewide four-day general bear season, according to preliminary totals released Tuesday by the Pennsylvania Game Commission.

This year’s two-day preliminary bear harvest compares to 1,622 bears taken during the statewide season’s first two days in 2018. In 2017, hunters took 1,310 bears over the same period. Through Monday, bears have been harvested in 51 counties during the statewide season.

Although the 2019 general season is off to a slightly slower start than last year’s, bears taken in the ongoing season raise the total Pennsylvania bear harvest to 3,205 when combined with harvests from a slate of earlier bear seasons including muzzleloader, special-firearms and archery. That total harvest, which will continue to increase, already tops the total 2018 statewide bear harvest of 3,153.

Expanded hunting opportunities provided by new special-firearms and muzzleloader bear seasons and an expanded archery bear season have helped push the 2019 bear harvest. Record bear license sales also have helped: license sales currently exceed 194,000; previously they have held at highs between 170,000 and 175,000. Add to that a statewide bear population of 20,000 and Pennsylvania finds itself with a chance to set a record bear harvest.

The state record bear harvest occurred in 2011, when 4,350 bears were taken.One bear exceeding 600 pounds was taken on the 2019 general season’s second day, Nov. 25. The top 10 bears processed at check stations over the season’s first two days were either estimated or confirmed to have live weights of 525 pounds or more.

Through all 2019 bear seasons, the largest bear was taken on the opening day of ongoing general season. It was a massive male estimated at 813 pounds taken in Smithfield Township, Monroe County, by Victor M. Vassalluzzo, of Kintnersville. He took it with a rifle at 7:15 a.m.

The heaviest bear ever taken in Pennsylvania was an 875-pounder harvested in 2010 in Middle Smithfield Township, Pike County, in 2010. Since 1992, seven black bears weighing at least 800 pounds have been lawfully harvested in Pennsylvania hunting seasons.

The second-largest bear in the 2019 general bear season was a 747-pound male taken by J. Kripp Jr., of Mountaintop. Harvested in Wright Township, Luzerne County, at 7 a.m., the bear was taken with a rifle.

Other large bears taken in the season’s first two days – all taken with a rifle – include: a 696-pound male taken in Penn Forest Township, Carbon County, by Brian J. Borosh, of Jim Thorpe; a 657-pound male taken in Franklin Township, Columbia County, by Nicholas A. Podgurski, of Elysburg; a 656-pound male taken in Hanover Township, Luzerne County, by Dale J. Kobal, of Hunlock Creek; a 623-pound male taken in Beech Creek Township, Clinton County, by Mikael J. Catanese, of Sewickley; a 620-pound male taken in Miles Township, Centre County, by Reuben Kennel, of Turbotville; a 604-pound male taken in Gallagher Township, Clinton County, Steven Z. Rohrbach, of Lock Haven; a 593-pound male taken in Genesee Township, Potter County, by Timothy J. Peskie, of Uniontown; and a 526-pound male taken in Cromwell Township, Huntingdon County, by Matthew R. Miller, New Oxford.

The preliminary two-day bear harvest by Wildlife Management Unit was as follows: WMU 1A, 10 (16 in 2018); WMU 1B, 34 (91); WMU 2A, 2 (5); WMU 2C, 65 (105); WMU 2D, 78 (102); WMU 2E, 32 (53); WMU 2F, 155 (174); WMU 2G, 273 (298); WMU 2H, 45 (55); WMU 3A, 79 (86); WMU 3B, 122 (103); WMU 3C, 46 (39); WMU 3D, 145 (115); WMU 4A, 66 (112); WMU 4B, 29 (49); WMU 4C, 45 (69); WMU 4D, 84 (103); WMU 4E, 18 (44); WMU 5A, 1 (3) and WMU 5C, 1 (0).

The top bear-hunting county in the state over the first two days of the season was Tioga County with 100 bears. It was followed by Lycoming County with 98 bears.

Two-day preliminary harvests by county and region are:

Northwest (188): Warren, 53 (46); Venango, 27 (65); Clarion, 25 (33); Forest, 24 (45); Jefferson, 23 (59); Crawford, 16 (43); Butler, 15 (15); Mercer, 4 (11); and Erie, 1 (14).

Southwest (102): Somerset, 33 (51); Armstrong, 26 (21); Indiana, 19 (28); Fayette, 13 (32); Cambria, 7 (13); and Westmoreland, 4 (7).

 

Northcentral (565): Tioga, 100 (71); Lycoming, 98 (87); Clinton, 75 (102); Potter, 70 (48); McKean, 55 (38); Elk, 48 (39); Clearfield, 47 (69); Centre, 30 (40); Cameron, 29 (54); and Union, 13 (13).

Southcentral (140): Huntingdon, 44 (70); Bedford, 30 (50); Fulton, 15 (32); Perry, 15 (13); Blair, 14 (17); Juniata, 8 (15); Mifflin, 6 (10); Franklin, 5 (14); Cumberland, 2 (1); and Adams, 1 (3).

Northeast (304): Pike, 58 (38); Monroe, 42 (36); Luzerne, 33 (40); Bradford, 30 (43); Wayne, 29 (26); Sullivan, 25 (24); Susquehanna, 24 (7); Lackawanna, 17 (12); Wyoming, 17 (24); Carbon, 14 (19); Columbia, 11 (16); and Northumberland, 4 (15).

Southeast (31): Dauphin, 13 (25); Schuylkill, 11 (13); Berks, 6 (1); and Lebanon, 1 (5)

The Pennsylvania Department of Transportation (PennDOT) hasoutlined steps they are taking and highlighted tools available to drivers to make travel as safe and efficient as possible for the upcoming Thanksgiving travel period.

Thanksgiving travelers are encouraged to visit the “Historic Holiday Traffic” page at www.511PA.com which allows users to see how traffic speeds on the Wednesday before and Sunday after Thanksgiving in 2017 and 2018 compared to traffic conditions during a typical, non-holiday week. Users can choose their region and view an hour-by-hour, color-coded representation of traffic speeds to help them decide the best times to travel during the holiday.

“Our goal is to not just minimize congestion, but to also focus on safe travel by providing motorists with as much information as possible,” said PennDOT Secretary Leslie S. Richards. “We encourage the public to use 511PA ahead of their trip to plan optimal drive times and to also slow down, buckle up, and to never drive distracted.

PennDOT traffic management staff have analyzed this holiday data and identified locations and timeframes where congestion typically increases dramatically during the holiday and will take steps to try to alleviate congestion and improve safety. The department will also partner with police for increased, strategic enforcement of speed and impaired driving laws.

In the Harrisburg region, PennDOT identified consistent, increased congestion on the Sunday after the holiday near I-81 southbound at the I-78 split in Lebanon County. To attempt to ease this congestion, the department will:

  • On the Wednesday before and the Sunday after the holiday, proactively alert motorists on Interstate 81 and I-78 north and east of the I-81/I-78 interchange of potential or actual delays using travel-time messages on electronic message signs;
  • Proactively alert motorists of potential or actual delays using travel-time messages on electronic message signs throughout the Harrisburg region;
  • Use highway advisory radio messages and electronic message boards to encourage travelers to reroute onto U.S. 22 westbound, which typically has excess capacity;
  • Partner with PSP on concentrated traffic enforcement near this area and to actively clear disabled vehicles from the roadway; and
  • Increase the hours and extend the coverage area that PennDOT’s State Farm Safety Patrol will be on duty and patrolling this section of highway.

In the Philadelphia region, major traffic issues are mostly confined to Black Friday in and around the major shopping areas. Staff identified I-95 in Delaware County, I-76 (Schuylkill Expressway), U.S. 1 near the Neshaminy Mall, and U.S. 202 and 422 near the King of Prussia Mall and the Philadelphia Premium Outlets as areas of increased congestion. To attempt to ease this congestion, the department will use electronic message boards to provide travelers with travel times to major roadways of interest and provide alerts about regional events impacting traffic during the holiday.

In the central region, congestion was identified at the I-80 Exit 161 (Bellefonte) in Centre County on the Sunday after Thanksgiving. PennDOT will:

  • On the Wednesday before the holiday, partner with PSP to monitor the I-80/I-99/Route 26 interchange in Centre County to manage traffic during peak congestion and on Sunday, December 1 from 12:00 PM to 8:00 PM PennDOT staff will manage traffic at the interchange with a flagging operation during peak congestion;
  • Proactively alert motorists of potential or actual delays using travel-time messages on electronic message signs;
  • Activate electronic message signs to reroute I-80 westbound traffic to Exit 173 (Lamar), use Route 64 south and return to I-99 southbound if necessary; and
  • Alert motorists of traffic conditions with highway advisory radio, electronic message signs and the 511PA service.

In the western region, traffic approaching the I-376 corridor east and west of the City of Pittsburgh on U.S. 19/Route 51, Route 28, U.S. 22, I-279, and I-79 will be alerted to I-376 conditions using electronic message boards. Staff will also be monitoring major interstates such as I-70, I-79, I-80 and I-90; and will be advising motorists to use parallel alternate routes, such as U.S. 19, U.S. 40, and U.S. 20, in the event that a major incident occurs on any of our Interstate Highways. In addition:

  • Messages regarding aggressive driving, impaired driving, and buckling up will be posted during the holiday;
  • Travel time messages will be posted leading into areas of identified historic congestion; and
  • Roadwork will be restricted on all interstates throughout the region.

To further increase traffic-data availability for traffic management staff, PennDOT partners with Waze, a real-time crowdsourced navigation app through which drivers share road conditions, to create a real-time dashboard through which staff can receive prioritized reports. As a member of the Waze Connected Citizens Program, the department can receive incident or roadway concern alerts faster and respond more quickly if necessary.

PennDOT will also remove lane restrictions and suspend construction projects wherever possible through the holiday period. Motorists can see active construction projects at www.511PA.com before they travel.

Motorists can check conditions on more than 40,000 roadway miles, including color-coded winter conditions on 2,900 miles, by visiting www.511PA.com. 511PA, which is free and available 24 hours a day, provides traffic delay warnings, weather forecasts, traffic speed information and access to more than 950 traffic cameras.

511PA is also available through a smartphone application for iPhone and Android devices, by calling 5-1-1, or by following regional Twitter alerts accessible on the 511PA website.

 

 

 

 

Tuesday November 26, 2019

 

 

Monday’s high, 40; OVERNIGHT LOW, 24

TUE-PARTLY CLOUDY, HIGH 57

TUE NIGHT-PARTLY CLOUDY, LOW 44

WED-SCATTERED SHOWERS ,HIGH 58

WED NIGHT-SNOW, LOW 32

THANKSGIVING DAY, SNOW SHOWERS TAPERING OFF, HIGH 37

THU NIGHT-LOW 25

 

Game Commission is pleased with early bear harvest results….Bridge to be named for Shinglehouse area WWII hero……Port Allegany woman falls asleep at the wheel…..Police look for hit and run vehicle…..

Bear hunters started Pennsylvania’s statewide four-day black bear season last Saturday with good weather and a preliminary harvest of 1,015 blacks bears, according to the Game Commission. Over the past two years, bear hunters have had some bad luck with weather, which has held down the harvest in Pennsylvania and helped maintain a bear population of around 20,000.Although the 2019 opening-day harvest is lower than last year’s – 1,241 bears, it raises the total Pennsylvania bear harvest to 2,886 when combined with a slate of earlier bear seasons including muzzleloader, special-firearms and archery. The 2017 general bear season opener produced a preliminary harvest of 659; which became one of the lowest on record for a four-day season.Pennsylvania’s best opening day preliminary harvest occurred in 2011 when 1,936 bears were taken. The state record bear harvest also occurred in 2011 when 4,350 bears were taken. Currently, Pennsylvania is on a pace that could exceed that record.For perspective, the 2018 bear harvest came in at 3,153 bears, 11th-best all-time.Other previous first-day statewide bear harvest totals were 1,297 in 2016; 1,508 in 2015; 1,623 in 2014; 1,320 in 2013; 1,320 in 2012; 1,936 in 2011; and 1,751 in 2010.Bears have been harvested in 50 counties on the statewide general season opener.The top 10 bears processed at check stations by Monday were either estimated or confirmed to have live weights of 491 pounds or more. All were taken on the opening day.The largest of those bears – a male estimated at 813 pounds – was taken in Smithfield Township, Monroe County, by Victor M. Vassalluzzo, of Kintnerville. He took it with a rifle at 7:15 a.m.The second largest bear was a 747-pound male taken by J. Kripp Jr., of Mountaintop. Harvested in Wright Township, Luzerne County, at 7 a.m., the bear was taken with a rifle.

Other large bears taken in the season’s opening day – all taken with a rifle – include: a 623-pound male taken in Beech Creek Township, Clinton County, by Mikael J. Catanese, of Sewickley; a 620-pound male taken in Miles Township, Centre County, by Reuben Kennel, of Turbotville; a 604-pound male taken in Gallagher Township, Clinton County, Steven Z. Rohrbach, of Lock Haven; a 593-pound male taken in Genesee Township, Potter County, by Timothy J. Peskie, of Uniontown; a 526-pound male taken in Cromwell Township, Huntingdon County, by Matthew R. Miller, New Oxford; a 510-pound male taken in Oswayo Township, Potter County, by Donald Z. Detwiler, of Telford; a 506-pound male taken in West Buffalo Township, Union County, by Allen S. Weaver, of Lewisburg; and a 491-pound male taken in Benezette Township, Elk County, by Mark L. Brennen, of St. Marys.

The preliminary first-day bear harvest by Wildlife Management Unit was as follows: WMU 1A, 9 (15 in 2018); WMU 1B, 27 (68); WMU 2A, 2 (5); WMU 2C, 46 (85); WMU 2D, 66 (83); WMU 2E, 24 (46); WMU 2F, 121 (120); WMU 2G, 194 (208); WMU 2H, 39 (46); WMU 3A, 65 (67); WMU 3B, 90 (71); WMU 3C, 32 (29); WMU 3D, 113 (90); WMU 4A, 55 (94); WMU 4B, 25 (44); WMU 4C, 34 (58); WMU 4D, 65 (77); WMU 4E, 7 (32); and WMU 5A, 1 (3).

 

The top bear-hunting county in the state on the first day of the season was Tioga County, with 76. It was followed by Lycoming County with 64.

Opening-day harvests by county and region are:

Northwest (158): Warren, 46 (32); Venango, 24 (52); Clarion, 22 (24); Jefferson, 18 (46); Forest, 17 (30); Butler, 15 (10); Crawford, 11 (29); Mercer, 4 (11); and Erie, 1 (11).

Southwest (80): Somerset, 24 (39); Armstrong, 19 (19); Indiana, 16 (23); Fayette, 10 (29); Cambria, 7 (13); and Westmoreland, 4 (5).

Northcentral (420): Tioga, 76 (53); Lycoming, 63 (50); Potter, 60 (36); Clinton, 54 (75); Elk, 40 (25); McKean, 40 (32); Clearfield, 34 (56); Centre, 21 (31); Cameron, 19 (45); and Union, 13 (8).

Southcentral (112): Huntingdon, 35 (64); Bedford, 22 (39); Fulton, 12 (28); Perry, 12 (11); Blair, 11 (11); Juniata, 8 (14); Mifflin, 5 (6); Franklin, 4 (12); Cumberland, 2 (1); Adams, 1 (3); and Snyder, 0 (3).

Northeast (222): Pike, 40 (26); Monroe, 34 (32); Luzerne, 26 (32); Wayne, 23 (24); Bradford, 19 (26); Sullivan, 19 (15); Susquehanna, 18 (5); Wyoming, 15 (22); Carbon, 11 (12); Lackawanna, 10 (8); Columbia, 7 (10); and Northumberland, 0 (9).

Southeast (23): Dauphin, 11 (24); Schuylkill, 8 (12); Berks, 3 (1); Lebanon, 1 (4); and Lehigh, 0 (3).

A Potter County bridge will be named in honor of a local World War II veteran under legislation introduced by Rep. Martin Causer (R-Turtlepoint) and now awaiting the governor’s signature.

The bill would designate the bridge on State Route 4021 over the Honeoye Creek in Sharon Township the Tec 5 C. Virgil Voorhees Memorial Bridge. Voorhees grew up in a home on Honeoye Road just outside of Shinglehouse.Voorhees served as a driver and radioman for the first platoon headquarters of Battery A, 155th Airborne Anti-Aircraft Battalion, United States Army. On March 24, 1945, he was killed instantly by enemy artillery fire as he was driving his jeep across open terrain in Germany.

Causer introduced House Bill 1754 to name the bridge at the request of Voorhees’ family and with the support of local officials and Shinglehouse American Legion Post 530. The bill was then amended into House Bill 1547, which is now awaiting the governor’s approval to become law.

A Port Allegany woman was slightly hurt in a one-vehicle accident early last Thursday morning in Liberty Township, McKean County. State police at Lewis Run say Michelle Crouse was going south on Route 155 near the intersection with Route 155 at around 2:30 am when she fell asleep at the wheel of her 2017 Chevrolet Cruze. The car drifted off the road and into a ditch where it stopped after hitting a concrete culvert. Crouse refused treatment after being checked over by EMS personnel.

Troopers at Lewis Run are also looking for a hit and run vehicle which damaged a parked vehicle in Kane between 9:pm Saturday and 5:30 am Sunday. An unknown unit went off of Dawson Street near Sedgwick Street and hit a parked vehicle causing damage to the front bumper and side mirror. The driver left the scene before police arrived. The offending vehicle is believed to be a larger white truck or SUV and would have damage on the passenger side bumper and mirror. Anyone who can identify the vehicle  is asked to call state police at 814.368.9230.