Monday July 23, 2018

Several “pinched”  by cops after “booze” was found at the Cream N Sugar, Main Street Coudersport during Eliot Ness Fest. More pictures in our gallery

Sunday’s high, 76; Overnight low, 67 .08” rain (1.56 overnight Saturday)

MON-CLOUDY, SCATTERED SHOWERS & THUNDERSTORMS, HIGH 75

MON NIGHT- CLOUDY, SCATTERED SHOWERS & THUNDERSTORMS, LOW  67

TUE– OVERCAST, SCATTERED SHOWERS & THUNDERSTORMS, HIGH 77

TUE NIGHT- OVERCAST, SCATTERED SHOWERS & THUNDERSTORMS, LOW 68

WED– SHOWERS & THUNDERSTORMS, HIGH 77

WED NIGHT-LINGERING SHOWERS, LOW 65

To hear today’s complete forecast, click on arrow below:

This is “Vehicle Theft Prevention” month as State police in Elk County investigate theft of pick up truck…Troopers also probe theft of prescription medication…DUI charges pending against several drivers including one involved in  a crash….Vandalism in Jones Township investigated….

Obituaries: Charles Sides, Coudersport & Helen Brown, Coudersport and Eliot Ness, Coudersport

To hear today’s podcast, click on arrow below:

Sunday’s high, 76; Overnight low, 67 .08” rain (1.56 overnight Saturday)

MON-CLOUDY, SCATTERED SHOWERS & THUNDERSTORMS, HIGH 75

MON NIGHT– CLOUDY, SCATTERED SHOWERS & THUNDERSTORMS, LOW  67

TUE– OVERCAST, SCATTERED SHOWERS & THUNDERSTORMS, HIGH 77

TUE NIGHT– OVERCAST, SCATTERED SHOWERS & THUNDERSTORMS, LOW 68

WED- SHOWERS & THUNDERSTORMS, HIGH 77

WED NIGHT-LINGERING SHOWERS, LOW 65

This is “Vehicle Theft Prevention” month as State police in Elk County investigate theft of pick up truck…Troopers also probe theft of prescription medication…DUI charges pending against several drivers including one involved I a crash….Vandalism in Jones Township investigated….

July is Vehicle Theft Prevention Month, and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration is urging drivers to protect their property from being stolen. A motor vehicle is stolen every 41 seconds in the United States, and more than 765,000 drivers fall victim to vehicle theft each year.

Thieves target vehicles; car parts such as radios and engines; and personal valuables inside the vehicle including cell phones, laptops, wallets and purses.

There were an estimated 765,484 thefts of motor vehicles nationwide in 2016. The estimated rate of motor vehicle thefts was 236.9 per 100,000 inhabitants. (See Table 1.)

The estimated number of motor vehicle thefts increased 7.4 percent in 2016 when compared with the 2015 estimates and 5.8 percent when compared with the 2012 estimates, and dropped 30.4 percent when compared with the 2007 estimates. (See Table 1A.)

Approximately $5.9 billion was lost nationwide to motor vehicle thefts in 2016. The average dollar loss per stolen vehicle was $7,680. (Based on Tables 1 and 15.)

Tips:

Close and lock all windows and doors when hou park

Park in well-lit areas\never leave your vehicle whilie it’s running

Never leave keys  or your valuables In your vehicle

Meanwhile, State police at Ridgway are looking for a pick up truck stolen over the weekend in Highland Township. The white 2013 Ford F-150 was taken between 5:00 pm Saturday and 6:00 am Sunday while parked on Highland Road. It bears PA registration ZDK2812,

Troopers there are also investigating the theft of some medicine from a Jones Township home Friday evening. The prescription  medication belonged to a 37 year old Wilcox woman and was taken at around 9:00 p. Anyone with information about either crime is asked to call the Ridgway barracks at 814.776.6136.

Dui charges are pending against a Kane driver after a one-vehicle crash Sunday morning in Wetmore Township, McKean County. According to state police at the Kane barracks, 24 year old Kyle Miller was going north on Highland Road at around 6:30 am during a rainstorm. His Toyota Camry went off of Highland Road about a half mile north of Novosel Road and rolled over after hitting a ditch. Police claim Miller left the scene, but was later located and reportedly admitted to driving under the influence of alcohol. He was arrested for speeding and authorities are awaiting lab results before arresting Miller for DUI……

A McKean County horse was slightly injured early Friday morning when it was hit by a car on Route 46 a half mile south of the Daily Brook Road in Keating Township, McKean County ..Trooeprs report the horse suffered minor laceration on its face but the driver of the SUV was not hurt and was able to drive away.

A 28 year old Shinglehouse man is facing DUI charges after being pulled over by troopers on Kings Rung Road in Ceres Township, McKean County last Thursday evening. Troopers say the driver, whose name has not been released, was stopped after committing several traffic violations. The suspect was taken to Bradford Regional Medical Center for a blood draw. A 3 yea rold  boy riding ti the 2009 Chevrolet Silverado was picked up at the scene by a  by another adult.

Two Elk County drivers are looking at DUI charges  Ridgway state police say a 46 year old Johnsonburg woman who was forced to stop on E. Main Street in Ridgway Saturday night. Police claim when  they interviewed the driver they determined she had been driving under the influence of alcohol. And, a 55 yearold Ridgway man is suspected of DUI after being stopped on theBoot Jack  Road late Frodau mogjt/

A recent criminal mischief in Jones Township, Elk County is being investigated by state police at Ridgway. Sometime between July 12 and 18, vandals drove through a yard on Hill Road causing about $300 in damage.

                                                                   Obituaries

Charles R. Sides, of Coudersport, PA (formerly of Manheim, PA), passed away peacefully at the age of 87 on Thursday, July 19, 2018 at Sweden Valley Manor, Coudersport.He was born January 12, 1931 in Buck, PA, the son of the late Charles R. and Florella (Miles) Sides.Charles was preceded in death by his wife of 45 years, Barbara M. Sides, his son, Charles P. Sides, and two brothers, Clyde Sides and John A. Sides.He is survived by his son and daughter-in-law, James L. Sides and Judith McNally Sides of Elizabethtown; son, Roy M. Sides of Manheim; daughter and son-in-law, Velda M. Hafner and Jay A. Hafner of Lancaster; seven grandchildren and two great grandchildren; brother S. Paul Sides of Indiana; daughter-in-law, Cindy Ruhl Sides Bowersox. Charles was a Korean War veteran, worked at High Steel hauling bridge beams, Jones & Laughlin Steel as a shear operator, then retired from Alumax after 26 years as a furnace operator in Lancaster.In lieu of flowers or cards, make your contribution in Charles’ memory by doing the following things: showing kindness, respect, and giving a friendly hello to people you may or may not know!

Helen Beyer Brown, 97, of Coudersport died, Thursday, July 19, 2018, at UPMC Cole, Coudersport, after a short illness.

Helen was born on June 6, 1921 in Wilmore to Victor and Alberta (Smith) Beyer, the oldest of 8 children. She married Irvan Andrew “Bud” Brown of Lloydell on May 1, 1943. Bud passed away on Dec. 14, 2015 after 72 years of marriage.  Bud and Helen lived in Lloydell and Mansfield, before moving to Coudersport in 1955. They raised eight children, Irvan Jr. of North Carolina, Dennis (deceased), Ronald of New York City, Irene of Lebanon, PA, Harold of South Carolina, Bernadette of North Carolina, Carolyn of Mehoopany, PA and Christopher of Arkansas.

Helen is survived by her 7 children, 13 grandchildren and 13 great grandchildren, as well as her sisters Ida Spaid, Lorraine Beyer, Alma Rounds and sister-in-law Jean Beyer.   Also surviving Helen is a great number of other relatives and friends who were lucky enough to have known her.

In addition to her parents, husband and son, Helen was preceded in death by a granddaughter, Rebecca Brown Dillmore, two brothers, Russell and LeRoy and two sisters, Dorothy and Ruth.

Helen was active in St. Eulalia Catholic Church activities, especially Catholic Daughters where she served in many local, regional and state activities. She was especially proud of her work with the church’s annual rummage sale. As the children were growing up she was involved in the 4-H Club and the family participation in the annual Potter County Fair was a major event.  She also participated, along with Bud, in polka groups in Pennsylvania and the surrounding area. Helen and Bud were avid travelers. Their destinations included Japan, Israel, Hungary, Austria, Slovakia, and London, as well as Alaska and many other states in the USA.

Helen will be sorely missed by her family, relatives, the congregation of St. Eulalia, the Catholic Daughters, and her many friends in Coudersport.

Family and friends are welcome to a visitation from 6-8:00 pm, Monday at the Thomas E. Fickinger Funeral Home, 210 North East Street, Coudersport and again from 10-11:00 am, Tuesday, at St. Eulalia Catholic Church, 6 Maple Street, Coudersport were a Mass of Christian Burial will be held at 11:00 am with Father James Campbell, officiating. Burial will follow at St. Eulalia Catholic Cemetery.

Memorial contributions may be made in Helen’s name to St. Eulalia Catholic Church, 6 Maple Street, Coudersport, PA 16915.

 

Eliot Ness, 54, of 105 E. Third Street, Coudersport, formerly of Cleveland, passed away suddenly on Thursday, May 16, 1957, at 5:15 p.m., at his home.

Mr. Ness was born on April 19, 1903 in Chicago, Ill., the son of the late Peter and Emma (King) Ness. On January 31, 1946, he married the former Elisabeth Andersen, who survived.

He attended the University of Chicago and earned a bachelor’s degree in business administration. He also studied criminology. Mr. Ness began a career in law enforcement with the Treasury Department’s Bureau of Prohibition. He was assigned to head up a task force of trusted, incorruptible men, which the media would label “The Untouchables,” as part of the federal government’s crackdown on organized crime in the Chicago area symbolized by mob boss Al Capone. Mr. Ness’s team focused on violations of the Volstead Act, prohibiting the sale and consumption of alcoholic beverages. Other investigators gathered evidence of tax evasion. Mr. Ness would later become a Chief Prohibition Investigator for the federal government’s Midwest District. After Prohibition was repealed, he became a Federal Alcohol Tax Unit investigator in Tennessee, Kentucky and southern Ohio.

Based on his outstanding record in federal service, Mr. Ness was appointed by Cleveland, Ohio, Mayor Harold Burton to serve in the influential position of Public Safety Director. He was chiefly responsible for reform of the police department, innovative solutions to traffic problems, institution of city-sponsored activities for troubled youths and a successful crackdown on organized crime and corruption.

Mr. Ness also served in an important position for the Federal Social Protection Program during World War II, traveling to military bases across the country in a law enforcement and public education capacity. He eventually entered the business world, where he served as chairman of the board of directors for Diebold, Inc., of Canton, Ohio. At the time of his death, he was president of the Coudersport-based Guaranty Paper Company, a subsidiary of North Ridge Industrial Corporation.

Mr. Ness was survived by his wife; a son, Robert Eliot Ness; a sister, Clara Jamie of California; and a brother, Charles Ness of Indianapolis, Ind. He was preceded in death by his parents and two sisters, Effie and Nora.

Services were held on Saturday, May 18, 1957, the Grabe Funeral Home, 210 North East Street, Coudersport, with the Rev. Robert H.R. Loughborough, minister of the First Presbyterian Church, Coudersport, officiating. A cremation followed. In 1997, Eliot, Elisabeth and Robert Ness were interred at Lake View Cemetery, Cleveland, Ohio.

Friday July 20, 2018

 

Enthusiasm builds in Coudersport for Eliot Ness Fest….Bridge replacement will begin Monday on the Big Shanty Road in McKean County….DCNR to begin pilot ATV program at Lyman Run State Park next Spring…..NY state driver and three young passengers hurt in one-vehicle crash Mondoay near Galeton…Criminal mischief in Homer Townshi, investigated by state police…

Thursday’s high, 80; Overnight low 50 No rain

FRI-MOSTLY SUNNY, HIGH  77

FRI NIGHT– CLOUDS BUILD, LOW 61

SAT-MOSTLY CLOUDY WITH RAIN, HIGH 70

SAT NIGHT-RAIN, LOW 62

SUN-RAIN, HIGH 76

SUN NIGHT-LOW 63

Weekend Forecast

Enthusiasm builds in Coudersport for Eliot Ness Fest….Bridge replacement will begin Monday on the Big Shanty Road in McKean County….DCNR to begin pilot ATV program at Lyman Run State Park next Spring…..NY state driver and three young passengers hurt in one-vehicle crash Mondoay near Galeton…Criminal mischief in Homer Townshi, investigated by state police..

Today’s podcast:

It’s been brewing for about 20 years, but this weekend the Eliot Ness Fest becomes a reality in Coudersport. The committee says “e can barely keep up with all of the downtown business involvement with this weekend’s Eliot Ness Fest. Olga’s Gallery, Cafe and Bistro at Main and Second streets is being transformed into Al’s Key Club. Fickinger Funeral Home will welcome visitors to view the setting for Eliot Ness’s funeral, look over the official 1957 records, and receive a free laminated bookmark containing Ness’s obituary. Hidden Passages book store on North Main Street is now selling the new book, “Behind the Badge: The Untold Story of Eliot Ness,” by Paul W, Heimel. Soon, Caroline Powers will open her temporary store, Ness-essary Fashions, in the Zito Media storefront on North Main, offering souvenirs and other items related to Eliot Ness and the festival. Coudersport is coming to life!

Parking for Eliot Ness Fest: Please be considerate of property owners and don’t park on lawns, sidewalks, business lots, etc. Parking is available in the locations listed on the map. All parking locations (with the exception of the handicapped parking lot located behind the Post Office, the volunteer parking lot at the Gunzburger Building, and the vendor parking next to the Consistory) have shuttle service to and from downtown (drop-off at the Courthouse) beginning at 12 noon on Friday. The Coudersport High School lot, Fastenel lot, and the lot across from the Consistory will have ADA shuttles. All other locations will be served by school buses. There is no fee to park but donations for shuttle service is encouraged and appreciated. Also on the map, you will find locations of the porta-johns. We will be updating information throughout tomorrow and the weekend, so please stay tuned.

The Pennsylvania Department of Transportation (PennDOT) is reminding area drivers that work to replace a box culvert on Big Shanty Road (Route 4001) in Lafayette Township is scheduled to start Monday, July 23.  A section of the road will be closed and an official detour will be in effect during the replacement.

The box culvert spans Bear Run on Route 4001, about 4 ½ miles northeast of the Route 59 intersection. Traffic will be detoured onto Route 219 and Route 59.  Residents living along Route 4001 will be able to access their homes during the replacement work.

This job is a cooperative effort between PennDOT McKean County Maintenance and L.C. Whitford, Co. of Wellsville, New York. McKean County Maintenance will excavate the area, remove the existing box culvert, and place back fill for the new box culvert.  The contractor will place the new box culvert, pave the approaches and deck, and install guide rail. All work is weather dependent.

The project is expected to be complete on or before August 3. Should work progress allow, PennDOT will re-open the bridge and roadway earlier. The 8-foot bridge dates from 1922 and carries an average of 1,750 vehicles each day.

 

The Department of Conservation and Natural Resources today announced the Bureau of State Parks will be conducting a pilot program, permitting ATV usage within the Lyman Run State Park Lower Campground, beginning Spring of 2019.

Starting May 24, the Friday before Memorial Day, through September 29, the last Sunday in September, campers using campsites in the Lower Campground will be permitted to park their ATV’s at their campsites. This will allow campers with ATVs to use the campground road, providing direct access from their campsite to the Susquehannock State Forest ATV trail system at the Lyman Trailhead, located 3/4 mile from the campground along Lyman Run Road.   Lyman Run Road is a township road that is open to ATV traffic.  This pilot program will run for two seasons starting in 2019 through 2020, after which it will be evaluated.

All operators must possess a valid Driver’s License to drive on the campground road and make the connection to the trailhead from Lyman Run Road. All DCNR ATV Riding Rules and Regulations will apply, and can be found at: http://www.dcnr.pa.gov/Recreation/WhatToDo/ATVRiding/RidingRulesandEnforcement/Pages/default.aspx

For more information on Lyman Run State Park or any of Pennsylvania’s other 120 state parks, go to www.dcnr.pa.gov.

A Schenectady driver and his young passengers all received minor injuries in a one-vehicle accident last Monday in West Branch Township, Potter County. State police report Daniel Roe was going south  on the West Branch Road when he saw a silver sedan going north in the middle of the road. Roe swerved to the right to avoid a collision and his Dodge Durango went off the pavement and rolled over onto the passenger side. Roe and the children, ranging in age from 5-9 years were taken to UPMC Cole by ambulance.

A criminal mischief in Homer Township Potter County sometime over the past few months is being investigated by state police. Between April 15 and this past Wednesday, vandals sot three rounds from a gun into a posted sign on Grom Hill Road belonging to 70 year old John Miller of Coudersport.

 

Thursday July 19, 2018

 

 

        

   Photo by Gerri Miller

Tuesday’s high, 80; Overnight low, 44; no rain
THU– SHUNNY, HIGH 74
THU NIGHT-CLEAR, LOW 63
FRI-MOSTLY CLOUDY, BREEZY, HIGH 77
FRI NIGHT-CLOUDY,POSSIBLE ISOLATED THUNDERSTORMS, LOW 61
SAT-MOSTLY CLOUDY, HIGH 70
SAT NIGHT -LATE EVENING SHOWERS POSSIBLE, LOW 62

To hear today’s complete forecast, click on arrow below:

 

Pennsylvania is taking steps to slow invasion of spotted lanternfly…PSU names faculty to help with the effort…..Coudersport Free Methodist Church changes name and moves into new building……Coudy rocks part of Eliot Ness Fest…..Mt. Jewett man arrested on drug and PFA violation charges…..

As if we don’t have enough to worry about. Pennsylvania is gearing up to battle an invasive insect, the Spotted Lanternfly.
The Spotted Lanternfly, Lycormadelicatula (White), an invasive plant hopper, has been discovered in Berks County, Pennsylvania. It is native to China, India, Vietnam, and introduced to Korea where it has become a major pest. This insect has the potential to greatly impact the grape, hops and logging industries. Early detection is vital for the protection of Pennsylvania businesses and agriculture.
If you live outside of the current (quarantine area) in Pennsylvania and find a spotted lanternfly, report it! Use this interactive Plant Pest Quarantine SearchOpens In A New Window to see if you’re in the spotted lanternfly quarantine area.

Identification:
The Spotted Lanternfly adult is approximately 1” long and 1/2” wide at rest. The forewing is grey with black spots and the wings tips are reticulated black blocks outlined in grey. The hind wings have contrasting patches of red and black with a white band. The legs and head are black; the abdomen is yellow with broad black bands. Immature stages are black with white spots, and develop red patches as they grow.

Signs & Symptoms:
Trees, such as tree of heaven and willow, will develop weeping wounds. These wounds will leave a greyish or black trail along the trunk. This sap will attract other insects to feed, notably wasps and ants. In late fall, adults will lay egg masses on host trees and nearby smooth surfaces like stone, outdoor furniture, vehicles, and structures. Newly laid egg masses have a grey mud-like covering which can take on a dry cracked appearance over time. Old egg masses appear as rows of 30-50 brownish seed-like deposits in 4-7 columns on the trunk, roughly an inch long.

What to do:
If you see egg masses, scrape them off, double bag them and throw them away. You can also place the eggs into alcohol or hand sanitizer to kill them. Please report all destroyed egg masses on our website.
Collect a specimen: Specimens of any life stage can be turned in to the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture’s Entomology lab for verification. Submit samples with the Entomology Program Sample Submission Form.
Take a picture: A photograph of any life stage (including egg masses) can be submitted to Badbug@pa.gov.

Report a site: If you can’t take a specimen or photograph, call the Automated Invasive Species Report Line at 1-888-4BAD-FLY (1-888-422-3359)and leave a message detailing your sighting and contact information.
As part of the partnership with the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture and USDA, the Penn State Extension spotted lanternfly website is the primary hub for educational and management information. Extension also is working with the state to create online training to assist businesses in meeting quarantine permitting requirements and is staffing a spotted lanternfly toll-free hotline. In addition, College of Agricultural Sciences researchers are leading efforts to learn more about the insect’s biology and control options.

Penn State researchers and extension personnel are working closely with state and federal officials to develop strategies to contain and control the spotted lanternfly, which threatens agricultural sectors worth about $18 billion to Pennsylvania’s economy. Scientists are racing to learn more about the pest’s biology and behavior, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture awarded Penn State a $1.2 million grant to lead outreach and communication efforts across the state.
As populations of spotted lanternfly grow and spread, management of this insect likely will increase in complexity and intensity over the next few years, according to Rick Roush, dean of the College of Agricultural Sciences.

As part of the partnership with the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture and USDA, the Penn State Extension spotted lanternfly website is the primary hub for educational and management information. Extension also is working with the state to create online training to assist businesses in meeting quarantine permitting requirements and is staffing a spotted lanternfly toll-free hotline. In addition, College of Agricultural Sciences researchers are leading efforts to learn more about the insect’s biology and control options.
Dennis Calvin, director of Penn State Extension and associate dean in the College of Agricultural Sciences since 2009, has assumed a new role overseeing the college’s efforts to combat the invasive spotted lanternfly. His appointment, which comes with the title of associate dean and director of special programs, was effective July 1.With Calvin’s shift in responsibilities, Jeff Hyde, Penn State Extension associate director for programs, will serve as acting director of extension.

Roush noted that Calvin is uniquely qualified to serve in this role due to his background and long-standing reputation in multiple facets of entomology and extension. “Because of his efforts to position Penn State as a national leader in extension, Dr. Calvin is well known and highly regarded among universities and government agencies in neighboring states, which will be critical as we coordinate with them on matters such as trade and interstate transport.”

Calvin joined the faculty of Penn State’s entomology department in 1985. For 11 years, he led Penn State’s integrated pest management, or IPM, program, which entailed developing and coordinating IPM initiatives and acting as a liaison with national, regional and state IPM groups.

His research has focused on modeling insect population dynamics and the effect that climatic uncertainty across the landscape plays in their management. He has developed expert systems and other computer-based decision-support systems for insect pest management in corn and alfalfa and trained county-based extension educators, private consultants, farmers and agribusiness personnel in pest management for field and forage crops and stored products.
He received a bachelor’s degree in agronomy and pest management from Iowa State University, and he earned his master’s and doctoral degrees in entomology from Kansas State University.

Hyde, a professor of agricultural economics, has developed and delivered extension educational programs on topics such as farm business planning, marketing and human resource management. From 2008 to 2015, he led Penn State Extension’s statewide ag entrepreneurship and economic/community development programs.
Before becoming associate director for programs — and then assuming the acting extension director position — Hyde served as associate head of the college’s Department of Agricultural Economics, Sociology, and Education and as assistant to the director for special program initiatives for Penn State Extension. He earned a bachelor’s degree from Frostburg (Md.) State University and master’s and doctoral degrees in agricultural economics from Purdue University.

The Coudersport Free Methodist Church is now GOD’S COUNTRY MINISTRIES.Sunday, July 22, 10 a.m. will be our 1st worship service in our new facility at 1237 E. 2nd Street, Coudersport (3 miles East of Coudersport on Route 6.)After 118 years of ministry centered at 507 S. Main St., we are moving into God’s future for our church family with a new name. Thank you to all who have prayed, worked, and encouraged us along the way. We look forward to an amazing future of serving Jesus by serving our community. On Sunday, Sept. 16 we plan to have our great Grand Opening celebration.

Coudy Rocks! 5 prize rocks have been hidden in Eliot Ness-relevant locations in downtown Coudersport. These rocks can be turned in at the inflatable bounce houses (lawn of the Park Methodist Church) on Friday and/or Saturday for free access to the inflatables all weekend (Friday 12p-8p and Saturday 9a-8p). Thank you to Lisa Bretz for painting these awesome rocks! #eliotnessfest #coudyrocks

There are still great places to stay within 25 miles of the Eliot Ness Fest – check them all out at the link below. Some specific mentions: The Laurelwood Inn (2 miles); Five Pines Lodge (3 miles); Susquehannock Lodge (13 miles) Oak Hall Bed and Breakfast (15 miles); Deering Run Bed & Breakfast (18 miles); Kettle Creek Adventures (25 miles). https://visitpottertioga.com/stay/… Window in the woods and Gobbler Hill properties.

A Mt. Jewett man was arrested late last night by Kane based state police for drug possession. Troopers explained that they were called to a home at 8Center Street in that town for a possible domestic violence incident in progress. When they arrived ,officers found 32 year old Ryan McClellan was trying to move his items of the residence in order to leave. While speaking with them they discovered he was in had a firearm and was thus in direct violation of a PFA issued by the City of Jamestown, NY. A search was conducted and a small blue and green glass pipe was found in McClelland’s left pants pocket .A backpack also held an unmarked pill bottle containing a green leafy substance that looked like pot. McClellan was arrested for possession of a small amount of marijuana, and possession of drug paraphernalia as well as violating a Protection from Abuse order.