Friday April 20, 2018

 

Photo by Gerri Miller

Barnum Road Wetlands, Eldred, PA

Thursday’s high, 35; Overnight low, 27; .125” snow

FRI-AM CLOUDS CLEAR OUT, HIGH 47

FRI NIGHT– LOW 31

SAT-MORE SUN, HIGH 54

SAT NIGHT-LOW 35

SUN-SUNNY, HIGH 58

SUN NIGHT-LOW 30

To hear the complete weekend forecast, click on arrow below.

 

 Youth Gobbler season starts tomorrow—regular spring gobbler season begins next Saturday….Efforts are being made to stop migration of invasive insect which could threaten hardwoods….Two area residents arrested on drug charges…..Elk County authorities continue to investigate simple assault occurring last week at the Ridgway Middle School…..

The approach of spring gobbler season has Pennsylvania hunters eager to get afield. That they’ll be participating in the state’s 50th anniversary spring-gobbler hunt further sweetens the pot.

Properly licensed junior hunters and mentored youth can head afield Saturday, April 21 to participate in Pennsylvania’s annual youth spring turkey hunt. A week later, on April 28, all hunters can head into Penn’s Woods in pursuit of spring gobblers.

The forecast for the coming season is a statewide turkey population numbering between 210,000 to 220,000 birds, said Mary Jo Casalena, the Pennsylvania Game Commission’s wild turkey biologist.

“Pennsylvania’s turkey population will provide plenty of excitement for those who choose to head afield for the Commonwealth’s golden anniversary spring turkey hunt,” Casalena said. “Make no mistake, Pennsylvania remains one of America’s premier turkey-hunting destinations.”

Turkeys are coming through a relatively mild winter, and they again had a tremendous acorn crop last fall to help them with winter survival. A light fall harvest – preliminarily estimated at 11,780 – sparked by greater supplies of fall foods and fewer hunters afield also has helped kindle increased expectations for the spring hunt.

“Last spring, hunters took 38,101 birds in the state’s turkey seasons,” Casalena said. “I expect a similar harvest this spring, somewhere between 36,000 and 38,000 turkeys.”

Hunters should note the second spring gobbler license only is on sale prior to the start of the season. Once April 28 rolls around, it’s too late to purchase one.

“So, hunters who want to ensure their best opportunity to hunt as many days of the season as they can need to buy the license soon,” Casalena said. “There’s promise for a great season.”

 

 

 

 

 

With spring and the accompanying emergence of insects upon us, grape growers, orchardists, nursery operators, homeowners and others in southeastern Pennsylvania are bracing for infestations of spotted lanternfly, an invasive pest from Asia that appeared for the first time in the United States in Berks County nearly four years ago.

Potentially at stake are Pennsylvania’s grape, tree-fruit, hardwood and nursery industries, which generate agricultural crops and forest products worth nearly $18 billion annually. The insect also can cause damage to high-value ornamentals in home landscapes and can affect quality of life for residents.

 

After the lanternfly’s discovery in 2014, the state Department of Agriculture imposed a quarantine regulating the movement of plants, plant-based materials and outdoor household items out of the quarantine area. Originally covering parts of eastern Berks County, the quarantine now encompasses all of Berks, Bucks, Chester, Lehigh, Montgomery, Northampton, Carbon, Delaware, Lancaster, Lebanon, Monroe, Philadelphia and Schuylkill counties.

Penn State Extension educators and College of Agricultural Sciences researchers are working with state and federal agriculture officials to study the insect, develop control strategies and educate local leaders, growers and the public about what to do if they find spotted lanternflies or their eggs. The goal is to stop the pest’s spread and, ultimately, to eradicate it.

Emelie Swackhamer, Penn State Extension horticulture educator based in Montgomery County, her Northampton County-based extension colleague Amy Korman, and other Penn State specialists have spoken at scores of public meetings and industry workshops, authored articles and fact sheets, served as expert sources for news media stories, trained Penn State Master Gardeners and other volunteers, and testified at General Assembly committee hearings.

Swackhamer said enlisting the public to help control lanternfly populations is a top priority. “This is a community problem, and it’s going to take a community effort to solve it,” she said.

Part of that effort is ensuring that citizens and businesses don’t unwittingly carry lanternflies or their eggs to other areas. “Spotted lanternflies are great hitchhikers, and they will lay eggs on a multitude of outdoor objects, such as cars, RVs and campers, plant materials, and other items that could be transported out of the quarantine area,” Swackhamer said. “To raise awareness, the state Department of Agriculture is using the slogan, ‘Look before you leave,’ emphasizing the need to inspect vehicles and other items before traveling out of a quarantined county.”

Lanternfly eggs are expected to hatch in late April or early May, so knowing what egg masses look like and destroying any that are found is an important control tactic, she said. But as eggs hatch, what can a grower or homeowner do to combat an infestation?

 

 

“When I get calls from residents seeking advice, I talk them through an integrated pest management (IPM) thought process,” Swackhamer said. “Start with mechanical approaches, such as scraping and destroying egg masses and swatting or vacuuming nymphs and adults, if practical. If you kill one female that could lay 100 eggs in its lifetime, you can have an impact on next year’s population.”

She also recommends conserving natural enemies such as spiders and praying mantids that prey on lanternflies. “If someone wants to use pesticides, they can try least-toxic options first, and they must take timing into account — not all methods will work on all life stages of the insect.”

The pest does not attack fruit or foliage. Rather, it uses its piercing-sucking mouthparts to feed on the woody parts of plants, such as grape vines and the trunks and branches of trees, where it excretes a substance known as honeydew and inflicts wounds that weep with sap.

The honeydew and sap can attract bees and other insects and provide a medium for growth of fungi, such as sooty mold, which covers leaf surfaces and can stunt growth. Plants with heavy infestations may not survive.

To develop near-term solutions for managing lanternfly infestations, Korman and Swackhamer have done applied research to test the efficacy of various pesticides, both contact insecticides and systemic products that are applied to plants and kill the pests when they feed on the sap. They also have looked at “softer,” lower-toxicity products.Researchers at Penn State’s Fruit Research and Extension Center in Biglerville, Adams County, also have conducted pesticide efficacy trials with an eye toward providing control solutions for growers of grapes and apples.

Until research bears more fruit, Penn State Extension and Penn State’s Department of Entomology are deploying state and federal funds to add staff and enhance extension programming. Entomologists also are seeking additional USDA grants to continue research on spotted lanternfly biology and behavior, the development of biocontrols such as natural enemies, and other topics related to this exotic and unusual pest.

As the battle against spotted lanternfly rages on, Korman urges homeowners and others not to let the “good-idea fairy” persuade them to use unconventional — and perhaps illegal — control methods that may be hazardous to themselves or harmful to the environment. .

For more information about how to identify and control spotted lanternfly, how to report an infestation and how to comply with quarantine regulations, visit the Penn State Extension website at https://extension.psu.edu/spotted-lanternfly or the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture website at http://agriculture.pa.gov.

Two area residents have been arrested on drug charges. .State police at Kane cited 19 year old Caden Lloyd of Port Allegany for possession of drug paraphernalia and summary traffic offenses. Troopers claim when they stopped Lloyd on Aok Street in Port Allegany just afternoon Thursday, they found drug paraphernalia inside his car.

Emporium state police arrested 21 year old John Wilson from  that town for possession of  suspected marijuana. Wilson was a passenger in a car stopped by police in a driveway on Sycamore Street on the afternoon April 11. Authorities claim they smelled pot while talking to the d river and allegedly found Wilson had been smoking the drug.

State police in Ridgway say a number of agencies are investigating a simple assault case allegedly  taking place last Friday afternoon at the Ridgway Middle School. A 40 yearold man is suspected of assault a 14 year old on school property and during school hours.

 

 

The approach of spring gobbler season has Pennsylvania hunters eager to get afield. That they’ll be participating in the state’s 50th anniversary spring-gobbler hunt further sweetens the pot.

Properly licensed junior hunters and mentored youth can head afield Saturday, April 21 to participate in Pennsylvania’s annual youth spring turkey hunt. A week later, on April 28, all hunters can head into Penn’s Woods in pursuit of spring gobblers.

The forecast for the coming season is a statewide turkey population numbering between 210,000 to 220,000 birds, said Mary Jo Casalena, the Pennsylvania Game Commission’s wild turkey biologist.

“Pennsylvania’s turkey population will provide plenty of excitement for those who choose to head afield for the Commonwealth’s golden anniversary spring turkey hunt,” Casalena said. “Make no mistake, Pennsylvania remains one of America’s premier turkey-hunting destinations.”

Turkeys are coming through a relatively mild winter, and they again had a tremendous acorn crop last fall to help them with winter survival. A light fall harvest – preliminarily estimated at 11,780 – sparked by greater supplies of fall foods and fewer hunters afield also has helped kindle increased expectations for the spring hunt.

“Last spring, hunters took 38,101 birds in the state’s turkey seasons,” Casalena said. “I expect a similar harvest this spring, somewhere between 36,000 and 38,000 turkeys.”

Hunters should note the second spring gobbler license only is on sale prior to the start of the season. Once April 28 rolls around, it’s too late to purchase one.

“So, hunters who want to ensure their best opportunity to hunt as many days of the season as they can need to buy the license soon,” Casalena said. “There’s promise for a great season.”

With spring and the accompanying emergence of insects upon us, grape growers, orchardists, nursery operators, homeowners and others in southeastern Pennsylvania are bracing for infestations of spotted lanternfly, an invasive pest from Asia that appeared for the first time in the United States in Berks County nearly four years ago.

Potentially at stake are Pennsylvania’s grape, tree-fruit, hardwood and nursery industries, which generate agricultural crops and forest products worth nearly $18 billion annually. The insect also can cause damage to high-value ornamentals in home landscapes and can affect quality of life for residents.

After the lanternfly’s discovery in 2014, the state Department of Agriculture imposed a quarantine regulating the movement of plants, plant-based materials and outdoor household items out of the quarantine area. Originally covering parts of eastern Berks County, the quarantine now encompasses all of Berks, Bucks, Chester, Lehigh, Montgomery, Northampton, Carbon, Delaware, Lancaster, Lebanon, Monroe, Philadelphia and Schuylkill counties.

Penn State Extension educators and College of Agricultural Sciences researchers are working with state and federal agriculture officials to study the insect, develop control strategies and educate local leaders, growers and the public about what to do if they find spotted lanternflies or their eggs. The goal is to stop the pest’s spread and, ultimately, to eradicate it.

Emelie Swackhamer, Penn State Extension horticulture educator based in Montgomery County, her Northampton County-based extension colleague Amy Korman, and other Penn State specialists have spoken at scores of public meetings and industry workshops, authored articles and fact sheets, served as expert sources for news media stories, trained Penn State Master Gardeners and other volunteers, and testified at General Assembly committee hearings.

Swackhamer said enlisting the public to help control lanternfly populations is a top priority. “This is a community problem, and it’s going to take a community effort to solve it,” she said.

Part of that effort is ensuring that citizens and businesses don’t unwittingly carry lanternflies or their eggs to other areas. “Spotted lanternflies are great hitchhikers, and they will lay eggs on a multitude of outdoor objects, such as cars, RVs and campers, plant materials, and other items that could be transported out of the quarantine area,” Swackhamer said. “To raise awareness, the state Department of Agriculture is using the slogan, ‘Look before you leave,’ emphasizing the need to inspect vehicles and other items before traveling out of a quarantined county.”

Lanternfly eggs are expected to hatch in late April or early May, so knowing what egg masses look like and destroying any that are found is an important control tactic, she said. But as eggs hatch, what can a grower or homeowner do to combat an infestation?

“When I get calls from residents seeking advice, I talk them through an integrated pest management (IPM) thought process,” Swackhamer said. “Start with mechanical approaches, such as scraping and destroying egg masses and swatting or vacuuming nymphs and adults, if practical. If you kill one female that could lay 100 eggs in its lifetime, you can have an impact on next year’s population.”

She also recommends conserving natural enemies such as spiders and praying mantids that prey on lanternflies. “If someone wants to use pesticides, they can try least-toxic options first, and they must take timing into account — not all methods will work on all life stages of the insect.”

The pest does not attack fruit or foliage. Rather, it uses its piercing-sucking mouthparts to feed on the woody parts of plants, such as grape vines and the trunks and branches of trees, where it excretes a substance known as honeydew and inflicts wounds that weep with sap.

The honeydew and sap can attract bees and other insects and provide a medium for growth of fungi, such as sooty mold, which covers leaf surfaces and can stunt growth. Plants with heavy infestations may not survive.

To develop near-term solutions for managing lanternfly infestations, Korman and Swackhamer have done applied research to test the efficacy of various pesticides, both contact insecticides and systemic products that are applied to plants and kill the pests when they feed on the sap. They also have looked at “softer,” lower-toxicity products.Researchers at Penn State’s Fruit Research and Extension Center in Biglerville, Adams County, also have conducted pesticide efficacy trials with an eye toward providing control solutions for growers of grapes and apples.

Until research bears more fruit, Penn State Extension and Penn State’s Department of Entomology are deploying state and federal funds to add staff and enhance extension programming. Entomologists also are seeking additional USDA grants to continue research on spotted lanternfly biology and behavior, the development of biocontrols such as natural enemies, and other topics related to this exotic and unusual pest.

As the battle against spotted lanternfly rages on, Korman urges homeowners and others not to let the “good-idea fairy” persuade them to use unconventional — and perhaps illegal — control methods that may be hazardous to themselves or harmful to the environment. .

For more information about how to identify and control spotted lanternfly, how to report an infestation and how to comply with quarantine regulations, visit the Penn State Extension website at https://extension.psu.edu/spotted-lanternfly or the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture website at http://agriculture.pa.gov.

Two area residents have been arrested on drug charges. .State police at Kane cited 19 year old Caden Lloyd of Port Allegany for possession of drug paraphernalia and summary traffic offenses. Troopers claim when they stopped Lloyd on Aok Street in Port Allegany just afternoon Thursday, they found drug paraphernalia inside his car.

Emporium state police arrested 21 year old John Wilson from  that town for possession of  suspected marijuana. Wilson was a passenger in a car stopped by police in a driveway on Sycamore Street on the afternoon April 11. Authorities claim they smelled pot while talking to the d river and allegedly found Wilson had been smoking the drug.

State police in Ridgway say a number of agencies are investigating a simple assault case allegedly  taking place last Friday afternoon at the Ridgway Middle School. A 40 yearold man is suspected of assault a 14 year old on school property and during school hours.

 

Thursday April 19, 2018

 

Photo by Gerri Miller

Barnum Road Wetlands, Eldred, PA

PA Senate has approved bill to enable local government and school districts to discuss school security in executive sessions….re-surfacing project underway on Route 49 in Tioga County…..Senate bill would increase penalties for drunk drivers in fatal crashes….Area state police make several DUI arrests… Ohio driver hurt in Elk County crash….trail cameras and utility trailer stolen from Eldred area….License plate stolen from car parked in Harrison Valley…..vandalism in Shippen Township probed by Emporium state police… 

Obituaries: Laverna Vargeson, Westfield & Frank Chase, Whitesville

The State Senate has unanimously approved legislation that would enable local governments and school districts to discuss school security matters in executive session, according to Senator Joe Scarnati (R-25).

Scarnati explained that Senate Bill 1078 was passed by the Senate this week and sent to the House of Representatives for consideration.  The legislation balances common sense concerns about protecting sensitive discussions and documents involving school security with the public’s “right to know.”

Following the latest school shooting in Florida, Scarnati said many schools in Pennsylvania are looking for ways to better protect those in their care, including identifying potential weaknesses in their current safety plans.  However, if made public, this information could compromise school safety efforts and put students in harm’s way.

Scarnati noted that over half of states throughout the  country currently have measures in place which allow for security and safety matters to be discussed in non-public executive session.

“Ensuring that students and teachers feel safe in their learning environments is a crucial part of helping children to learn and succeed,” Scarnati said.  “While Senate passage of this legislation is a positive step forward, there is still work to be done. Discussions with the PA Department of Education, State Police, educators and security experts continue to progress, and we continue to look for more ways to safeguard our schools.”

A contractor is beginning work this week on a resurfacing project on Route 49 in Tioga County.The project is from Route 4007 (California Hollow Road) in Westfield Township to Route 249 in Knoxville Borough. There will be single lane conditions under daylight flagging. This project is expected to be completed in early August.Dalrymple Gravel and Contracting Co., Inc. is the prime contractor on this $1.5 million project.

The state Senate has passed and sent to the House legislation that will increase mandatory sentences for repeat drunk drivers who are involved in fatal accidents. Don Rooney has more

The legislation increases the mandatory minimum sentencing for homicide by vehicle when the offender is Driving Under the Influence and has prior DUI offenses:  from the current 3 years to 5 years when there is a prior DUI conviction; and from the current 3 years to 7 years when the defendant has three or more DUI convictions.

Senator Andy Dinniman says he became a co-sponsor of the bill after an incident in  April of 2012. Robert Landis of Chester County, who had 7 previous convictions for DUI, was operating his pickup truck at a blood alcohol level of .28 when he turned in front of 24-year-old Liam Crowley’s motorcycle killing him. Even though Mr. Landis had 7 prior convictions for DUI, he faced the same 3 year mandatory sentence he would have faced had this been his first DUI.

Coudersport based state police had scheduled a sobriety checkpoint for last weekend, but due to weather and poor visibility, troopers used roving DUI patrols instead. They made three DUI arrests, arrested one person for fleeing or attempting to elude police officers (a felony), arrested one suspect for reckless endangerment, one for possession of marijuana and related paraphernalia, and two for underage drinking.

A Smethport woman has been arrested by state police at the Coudersport barracks for DUI. Authorities relate that  charges were filed against 27 year old Katelyn Levey after being stopped on the afternoon of March 18 at the intersection of Route 607 and Garretson Street in Austin by troopers investigating a crime at a home  in that area involving a vehicle matching the description of the one driven by Levey  .During the investigation, officers allegedly found Levey  and her passengers had been at the residence and they determined she was operating the unit under the influence of a controlled substance. Cops did not elaborate on the crime which may have been committed at that location prior to their response.

DUI charges are pending against a couple of other area residents. David Smyth, 51 of Coudersport was stopped on Route 44 in Eulalia Township late last Saturday night; Fellow Coudersport resident 30 year old Brandon Hostler was cited after being pulled over on Route 6 West in Roulette Township last Thursday afternoon for various traffic violations. State police assert 34 year old Jason Wlas of Galeton had drugs and drug paraphernalia in his 2004 Subaru Outback Sport when they questioned him on the night of April 7 on Route 6 in Gaines Township. An 18 year old Turtlepoint resident is suspected of possessing a small amount of pot after he was pulled over on Route 155 in Annin Township, McKean County last night.

A one-vehicle crash in Elk County Wednesday morning resulted in minor injuries for an Ohio driver. Ridgway based state police report Floyd Ball of St. Clairsville was speeding when his Ford F250 slid across the rain and ice covered Route 66, spun around and collided with several trees before stopping. He was taken  to Kane Community Hospital by ambulance.

Troopers in Kane are investigating two thefts in the Eldred area. Sometime last November, thieves stole two trail cameras from the home of Marlene Eaton on the Duffytown Road. A utility trailer owned by Edward Lyons was stolen from his property on Sweitzer Drive in Duke Center between April 2 and 15. It’s described as being a black 5 x 7 trailer with plywood sides and carries PA registration XY49664. Anyone with information about either of those crimes is asked to contact state police @ 814.778.5555.

Coudersport based state police are looking for a thief who took a license plate off of a vehicle parked on East Main Street in Harrison Valley between March 31 and April 11. The plate with PA registration KNV4977 is valued at $35 and was removed from a 2005 Chevrolet owned by Mariah Morgan of Towanda, PA.

Vandalism, to property in Shippen Township, Cameron County remains under investigation by troopers in Emporium. Sometime between 9:00 pm Tuesday and 8:0 0 am Wednesday, someone pulled two stakes and a reflector from along the Downey Hollow Road owned by a 45 year old Emporium man and threw them into the bushes across the road.

Obituaries

Laverna I. VARGESON, 79, of Westfield, PA, died Wednesday, April 11, 2018 in her home.  Born September 2, 1938, in Harrison Valley and raised in Brookfield, she was the daughter of Harold H. and Esther Widger Dibble.  She married Richard D. Vargeson, who survives.  She was co-owner of Vargeson’s Restaurant in Westfield and was employed by Galeton Production, Stackpole Industries, and Kane Magnetics.averna previously served as Vice President of the Westfield Area Historical Society and was the current Vice President of the Elkland Area Senior Citizens Club.  Surviving besides her husband, Dick, are:  four sons, Roy (Sharon) Vargeson, Rick (Ruby) Vargeson, Rodney (Julia) Vargeson, and Rob Vargeson;  a daughter, Christina (Gary) Stahli;  eight grandchildren; Michael (Heidi) Vargeson, Ryan, Matthew (Chelsea) Vargeson, Jeremy Vargeson, Adam (Stevie) Vargeson, Bruce (Karrissa) Stahli, Scott Stahli, and Emily Avery;  seven great-grandchildren, Tyler Vargeson, Makayla Vargeson, Jordan Vargeson, Chase Vargeson, Emmah Stahli, Aubrey Stahli, and Camden Stahli;  a sister, Beverly Barbano;  nieces and nephews.  She was predeceased by two brothers, Roland Dibble and Walter Dibble.Services will be private.Memorials may be made to the Westfield Area Historical Society, 151 W. Main St., Westfield PA 16950.Arrangements are entrusted to the Olney Funeral Home & Cremation Service, Ulysses, PA.Online condolences may be expressed at www.olneyfuneralhome.com.

Frank E. CHASE, 65, of Whitesville, NY, died Tuesday, April 17, 2018 in Highland Hospital, Rochester, NY.  Born November 11, 1952, in Wellsville, he was the son of Frank L. and Joyce Langdon Chase.  On March 3, 1973, in Ulysses, PA, he married the former Vickie Carr, who survives.  He was employed by Dresser-Rand in Wellsville and Fitzpatrick Poultry Farms in Whitesville.  Surviving besides his wife, Vickie, are:  his mother and step-father, Joyce and Dennis Pritchard of Whitesville; three sons, Frank (Bobbi) Chase of Sayre, PA, Keith (Heather) Chase of Ulysses, PA, and Allan (Darlene) Chase of Elmira;  eight grandchildren;  two great-grandchildren;  three brothers, Randall Chase of Wellsville, Robert Pritchard of Little Genesee, and Rodney Pritchard of Wellsboro, PA;  a sister, Sally Houston of Hornell;  three step-siblings, Carol (Jim) Phillips of Virginia Beach, VA, Dave (Janice) Hutchison and Cindy (Ron) Welch, both of Whitesville;  nieces, nephews, an aunt, an uncle and cousins.  He was predeceased by his father and step-mother, Frank L. and Ruby Chase;  a sister, Tonya Whitsell.  A gathering celebrating Frank’s life will be announced on a later date.  Burial will be in Whitesville Rural Cemetery.   Memorials may be made to the Whitesville Volunteer Fire Dept., P.O. Box 256, Whitesville, NY 14897.  Arrangements are entrusted to Olney Funeral Home & Cremation Service, Ulysses, PA. Online condolences may be expressed at www.olneyfuneralhome.com.

 

Wednesday April 18, 2018

 

Photo by Gerri Miller

Barnum Road Wetlands, Eldred PA

Tuesday’s high, 31; Overnight low 27; trace + of snow

WED-SNOW SHOWERS LATE, HIGH 50

WED NIGHT-SNOW SHOWERS, LOW 40

THU-CLOUDS INCREASE, HIGH 30

THU NIGHT-SHOWERS, LOW 28

FRI-MOSTLY CLOUDY, CHANCE OF SHOWERS, HIGH 37

FRI NIGHT-CLOUDY, LOW 35

 Registration Underway for Northern PA Regional College’s Summer Semester ….PennDot lifts weight restrictions on Cameron County Bridge…..Roulette man bound over to court on sexual assault charges including incest…Two Lawrenceville men arrested for fighting….DUI charges pending against Wellsboro driver found passed out at the wheel…..New state law will give judges more latitude in domestic violence cases…..

The Northern PA Regional College, in partnership with Gannon University, is offering nine courses for the summer semester, including: Principles of Microeconomics, Introduction to Literature, Introduction to Music, Introduction to Philosophy, History without Borders, Business Technology II, Management Theory & Practice, US Government & Politics, and Psychology of Human Development.

These courses are part of two associate degrees – Business Management or Interdisciplinary Studies. However, if a student is not pursuing an associate degree at this time, they can choose the course or courses they need for personal or professional development or take courses to transfer towards a degree program at another college or university.

This program is perfect for recent high school graduates, mid-career adults seeking to advance in their career or begin a new one, and current high school juniors and seniors who meet eligibility requirements and want to earn college credits while still in high school. This program is designed to be affordable, with state funding helping to keep tuition costs low. Students with a high school diploma or GED pay just $180 per credit. Current high school students pay just $60 per credit. Financial aid and scholarship opportunities are available.

District judges will have the tools they need to better protect domestic violence victims under a bill that was signed into law today, according to the measure’s sponsor, Senator Camera Bartolotta (R-46).Senate Bill 449 – which was named Tierne’s Law in honor of Tierne Ewing, a Washington County resident who was kidnapped and later murdered by her estranged husband in August 2016 – clarifies the use of risk assessment tools by district judges when setting bail in domestic violence cases.

Risk assessment tools have proven to be effective in predicting an abuser’s odds of re-offending and creating a dangerous circumstance for victims, Bartolotta said.“Far too many domestic violence victims suffered terrible consequences even after the crimes were committed, simply because judges did not have the information they needed to keep the most dangerous offenders behind bars,” Bartolotta said. “I am extremely thankful that we have taken a critical step to ensure judges can make the best decision possible when deciding whether to set bail for offenders.”Bartolotta was joined by members of Tierne’s family at the bill signing.

“My heart goes out to Tierne’s loved ones for the terrible loss they have suffered, and I deeply appreciate the fact that they could join us for today’s bill signing,” Bartolotta said. “They have shown incredible strength through this entire ordeal by dedicating themselves to becoming advocates for stronger laws to protect domestic violence victims.”

Last year, Pennsylvania provided support to more than 89,000 victims of domestic violence. Domestic violence played a role in 102 homicides in 2016, including eight in the counties Bartolotta represents.

Tierne’s Law was part of a package of bills approved by the Senate in March to protect crime victims.

A Roulette man has been bound over to county court on n sexual assault charges and related offenses, an incident reportedly taking place in his Main Street home on the night of March 19. Jedidiah Davis,32, was arrested the next day by Sweden Township police, who provide coverage to Roulette Township and unable to post bail after arraignment was committed to the Potter County Jail where he remains in lieu of $75,000 bail.  Authorities claim a 13 year old girl awoke at around 10:30 pm to find Davis in her bed attired only in his underwear and touching her inappropriately. According the arresting officer, Davis admitted wearing only underwear and he “felt” that was inappropriate. Following last Friday’s preliminary hearing, Davis was held for county court on felony  charges of Rape Forcible Compulsion

Rape of Child,Invol. Deviate Sexual Intercourse W/Child’Sexual Assault’Agg. Ind. Assault – Comp. Less Than 16, Agg. Ind. Assault of Child

Indecent Assault Person Less than 13 Years of Age,

Indecent  Assaul lt of Person Less 16 Yrs Age

Incest of Minor – Complainant Under 13 Years,

Incest of Minor – Complainant 13-18 Years, endangering Welfare of Children – Parent/Guardian and Corruption Of Minors

Both Lawrenceville men involved in a scuffle on the night of April 6 on Station Road in that town. State police allege a domestic violence argument escalated to the point of one man being charged with simple assault, harassment, and disorderly conduct. The other was arrested for simple trespass, harassment and disorderly conduct.

A 34 year old Wellsboro driver is facing DUI charges after being found passed out at the wheel of his 2007 Nissan Altima Saturday evening. Troopers claim the suspect had parked the car in the Eastbound lane facing west at the intersection of Cherry Flats Road and Nickle Lane in Charleston Township and was found with his foot on the brake.

With repairs complete, the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation (PennDOT) has removed weight restrictions on a Rich Valley Road/Straight Creek Road (Route 4004) bridge in Cameron County. The 51-foot bridge spans the Driftwood Branch of Sinnemahoning Creek in Shippen Township, east of the Elk/Cameron County line. The bridge carries an average of less than 50 vehicles daily.

The one-lane, timber deck bridge had been posted with weight limits of 21-ton for single vehicles and 33-ton for combination vehicles. Now that repairs have been made to the beam ends, PennDOT has removed the restrictions.

Potter County PennDot Crews are repairing signs  this week:

  • Various State Routes throughout the Coudersport area

Bridge Flushing/Sweeping:

  • State Route: 0872 (Austin area)
  • State Route: 3001 (East Fork)
  • State Route: 3002 (Cowley Hill)
  • State Route: 0144 (Cross Fork)
  • State Route: 0044 (Oleona)

Shoulder Repair:

  • State Route: 4013 (North Hollow)
  • State Route: 0044 (Cherry Springs)

Inlet Cleaning:

  • State Route: 4017 (Sunny Side)

Pipe Inspection:

  • State Routes: 0449, 0244 and 1010 in the town of Genesee

Pipe Replacement:

  • State Route: 0049 (near Gold)

Ditch Cleaning:

  • State Route: 1008 (Empson Road)
  • State Route: 1015 (Collins Hill Road)
  • State Route: 4017 (Sunny Side)

Brushing:

  • State Route: 2002 (West Branch)

Crack Sealing:

  • State Route: 0049 (Ulysses Borough)

The following work is scheduled to be completed by contractor, weather permitting:

  • Glenn O Hawbaker: roadway improvement work on State Route 44 from Shinglehouse Borough to Coneville.  Alternating traffic patterns with short delays possible.
  • Glenn O Hawbaker: upgrade existing drainage on State Route 155 in Shippen and Portage Townships, from Emporium to Potter County line. Temporary run around at Crooked Run around Sizerville with alternating patterns.
  • Rylind Construction Company: bridge replacement on Moore Hill Road (SR 3001). Temporary traffic signals and lane closures will be in place.
  • Public-Private Partnership with Plenary Walsh Keystone Partners: bridge replacement on State Route 44 (Pine Hill Road) near village of Carter Camp in Abbott Township. Alternating traffic pattern with temporary traffic signals will be in place.

For more information, visit www.dot.state.pa.us or call 814-274-9181

Motorists can check conditions on more than 40,000 roadway miles by visiting www.511PA.com. 511PA, which is free and available 24 hours a day, provides traffic delay warnings, weather forecasts, traffic speed information and access to more than 825 traffic cameras.

511PA is also available through a smartphone application for iPhone and Android devices, by calling 5-1-1, or by following regional Twitter alerts accessible on the 511PA website.

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Obituary

Mark D. Hand, age 49, of Mills, PA, passed away on Monday, April 16, 2018 at Jones Memorial Hospital, Wellsville, NY. He was born on October 1, 1968 in Coudersport, PA, a son of Carlton L. Hand and Reha “Betty” (Mahnke) Hand. Mark enjoyed watching TV and doodling, music and riding four wheelers.

Mark is survived by his mother, Reha Hand of Mills, PA; eight siblings and their spouses, Lester Mahnke of Palmyra, PA, Arthur (Peggy) Hand of Harrison Valley, PA, Kathleen (Donald) Tilton of Ulysses, PA, Douglas (Cheryl) Hand of Mills, PA, Carl Hand of Mills, PA, Sandra Sheehy of Knoxville, PA, Joe (Norma) Hand of Mills, PA; Rose Kenderdine of Potter Brook, PA. Mark was preceded in death by his father, Carlton.

Family and friends are invited to call on Thursday, April 19, 2018 from 6PM to 8 PM and Friday 11AM to Noon at the Ulysses Free Methodist Church, 602 S Main St, Ulysses, PA 16948. A funeral service will be held at the church on Friday, April 20, 2018 at Noon. A luncheon will follow the service at the church. A private burial will be in North Bingham Cemetery. Services are under the direction of the Buckheit Funeral Chapel and Crematory, Inc. 637 S. Main St. Mansfield, PA. www.buckheitfcandcrematory.com