Tuesday January 16, 2018

Winter Contrasts by Gerri Miller

Monday’s high, 23; low 16; 1.5” new snow

TUE-MOSTLY CLOUDY, PERIODS OF LIGHT SNOW HIGH 28

TUE NIGHT-SNOW SHOWERS CLEAR OUT, MOSTLY CLEAR, LOW 7

WED-PARTLY TO MOSTLY SUNNY, COOLER, HIGH 18

THU-MOSTLY CLOUDY, BREEZY HIGH 23

To hear today’s forecast, click on arrow below.

The new Tioga County Lyme Disease support group will meet Thursday night in Wellsboro….NY Gov. Cuomo announces news steps to curb Lyme Disease…Area women encouraged to sign up for Winter Women in the Wilds at Sinnemahoning State Park next  month….St. Marys resident accused of stealing leased equipment and two area men arrested for possessing drug paraphernalia…. 

To hear today’s podcast, click on arrows below.

Obituaries: David “Dve”Cutler, Bolivar (Smethport)

Doyle Cleveland Roulette (Olean)

 

Photo by John Eaton

 Luke Dunham (left) and Thomas Putnam prepare to distribute posters and information about the documentary “Under Our Skin,” the untold story of Lyme disease. The film will be shown during the Tioga County Lyme Disease Support Group meeting on Thursday, Jan. 18 at 6:30 p.m. in Wellsboro.

Wellsboro area residents Luke Dunham and Thomas Putnam are leading the newly formed Tioga County Lyme Disease Support Group to help people in Tioga County and surrounding areas who think they may have a tick-borne illness as well as those who have been diagnosed and are seeking support and information.

Dunham and Putnam recently formed the support group under the auspices of the PA Lyme Resource Network. Both men are regional co-leaders with the network, a statewide organization that is a registered 501c3 nonprofit corporation.

The Tioga County Lyme Disease Support Group is meeting for the first time on Thursday, Jan. 18 from 6:30 to 8 p.m. at the Tokishi Training Center at 124 Nypum Drive in Wellsboro. To be shown at that meeting will be the documentary “Under Our Skin,” the untold story of Lyme disease. A question and answer session will follow, led by Linda Wales of Millerton, founder of A Hope for Lyme in Horseheads, New York.  The meeting is free and open to the public.

“Looking back, I know I had symptoms starting in 2009,” said Dunham. Between 2012 and 2013, he did not feel well. “My worst symptoms started in 2014.”

Dunham was suffering from severe fatigue, migrating joint pain, heart palpitations, neurological problems, difficulty with short-term memory called “brain fog” and “air hunger,” the feeling that he was not getting enough oxygen.

The experiences of a colleague in the Tioga County Probation Department who had late-stage Lyme disease symptoms led Dunham to be tested. In 2013, he had the ELISA test, used to measure antibodies in the blood to identify certain infectious diseases, such as Lyme. It was negative. He had a positive Western blot test and was diagnosed on Sept. 11, 2014.

“This disease has impacted every part of my life, from physical to mental,” Dunham said. “Initially I was put on the antibiotic Doxycycline. After that failed, I was put on multiple classes of antibiotics.” To get well, he has been undergoing treatment much longer than standard protocols.

“I’m probably 75 percent better than I was early on,” said Dunham. “I experience many of the same symptoms but to a much lesser degree and more sporadically. About six months ago, I stopped taking antibiotics and relapsed. Long-term antibiotics, supplements and diet are the main treatment options today.”

“It’s a tricky disease,” said Putnam who is Hamilton-Gibson Productions artistic director. “The kind of test, the lab that analyzes it, the timing of the test, and the current unreliability of tests especially in being able to identify the multiple co-infections, all create a kind of crapshoot, at best.”

In March of 2017, Putnam was tested at two different hospitals. Both tests were negative. He then went to an infectious disease specialist, tested positive and was diagnosed in May of 2017.

“I had no reason to believe I had been bitten by a tick,” said Putnam. “The symptoms hit me hard this past March. I had extreme lightheadedness and had to hang onto walls or crawl just to move from room to room.” His white blood cell count was low. He had roving joint pain, strange headaches “not really pain but pressure and heat,” a 103-degree temperature at times and “horrendous” fatigue so he was barely able to get up in the morning and needed to nap during the day. “Brain fog was the most alarming. I couldn’t focus or concentrate or remember what I had just done,” Putnam said.

“I took Doxycycline. an antibiotic,” It was prescribed for only one month. Putnam’s symptoms lessened considerably but all reappeared about a month after he stopped taking the drug. That’s when he began a more rigorous treatment plan. “I am still on it and am much better today,” he said.

Dunham was the first person Putnam spoke to about his symptoms. “It was quite by accident,” Putnam said. “We shared symptoms and I told him about my treatment,” said Dunham.

“Not long after that, we became interested in forming a Tioga County Lyme Disease Support Group because of our experiences, which are unfortunately common,” Dunham said. “Lyme can be much more complex than an acute bacterial infection that can be diagnosed and easily cured. People can be infected by Lyme and one or more co-infections. Tick-borne disease would be a better name since there are many possible infections that can result from ticks and other vector-borne transmitters.” Co-infections can be caused by multiple strains of Borelia or other organisms such as Bartonella, Ehrlichiosis, Babeiosis and Powassan Virus.

“Thinking of Lyme as a complex set of medical problems that can manifest in a variety of ways depending on the infectious organism and the response a person has to it is the new way of looking at this disease,” said Dunham.

“If caught early, there is a much higher treatment success rate. Unfortunately there is still controversy among scientists and researchers involving testing, diagnosis, definitions and treatment. Right now, peer-reviewed science is happening and I believe good news will come from it eventually,” Dunham said.

“In the meantime, Thomas and I think it is important to have a place where we can offer some support and guidance to those who are suffering. While there may not always be clear answers, there will be people who are experiencing what we have. The best words someone in this situation can hear are ‘I believe you.'”

Lyme disease has been confirmed in all 67 counties in Pennsylvania. The Commonwealth has the dubious distinction of leading the nation in the number of cases diagnosed annually.

A 501c3 nonprofit, the network provides education, patient advocacy, support and resources to help others navigate Lyme and tick-borne illnesses in the Commonwealth and also supports regional and independent Lyme groups across the state that hold local meetings to give support, education, and resources to their local communities.

The  Tioga County Lyme Disease Support Group will meet regularly on the third Thursday of each month from 6:30-8 p.m. The next meeting will be on Thursday, Feb. 16 at the Tokishi Training Center in Wellsboro.

For more information, contact Dunham and Putnam by email at tiogacountylyme@palyme.org or by calling Putnam at 570-439-2000.

 

Meanwhile, the website lymedisease.org reports Governor Andrew Cuomo of New York this week laid out a wide-ranging agenda that included specific provisions related to Lyme and other tick-borne diseases.

 

In August 2017, the New York State Department of Health launched a multi-faceted initiative to safeguard New Yorkers from tick-borne diseases with expanded tick surveillance and an aggressive awareness and outreach campaign in collaboration with the Department of Environmental Conservation.

However, in some parts of New York State, tick-borne diseases are on the rise, posing a threat to both individual New Yorkers and our regional economies that rely on outdoor recreation. Each year, there are approximately 8,000 cases of Lyme disease, 700 cases of 266 anaplasmosis, 400 cases of babesiosis, 100 cases of ehrlichiosis, and 30 cases of other tick-borne illnesses reported to the Department of Health—with many other cases going unreported. And 2017 also brought deadly cases of the rare tick-borne disease Powassan.

In 2018, Governor Cuomo will launch an aggressive initiative to reduce the incidence of Lyme Disease and other tick-borne illnesses in New York State, by controlling tick populations on public lands, advancing research on diagnostics and treatment, and further increasing public awareness.

Sinnemahoning State Park is now accepting registrations for the 2018 Winter Women in the Wilds event, which will be held at the park during the weekend of February 16-18, 2018.

(L) Park Manager Lisa Bainey teaches a cross country skiing class

(R) Lin Kline, a program participant learns to cross country ski

The Women in the Wilds event at Sinnemahoning State Park is a ladies-only weekend of outdoor recreation and environmental education. The 2018 Winter WITW event offers women the opportunity to participate in activities such as cross-country skiing, snowshoeing, ice skating, fly tying, nature painting, essential oils, animal tracking, open hearth cooking, winter bird walk and indoor yoga.

 

Program fee is $70 per person. Fee includes choice of seven outdoor recreation and interpretive classes, Friday evening snacks, lunch and dinner on Saturday, lunch on Sunday, plus all program materials and supplies. Equipment for cross country skiing, snowshoeing, and ice skating will be provided. Sizes are limited. Program fee does not include overnight accommodations or breakfast either day.  A list of local cabins, B&Bs, and motels will be provided upon request.

Pre-registration and pre-payment required by Saturday, February 3rd. Limit 30 people.

For more information about Women in the Wilds or other programs at Sinnemahoning State Park, please call the park office at 814-647-8401.  Additional details can be found on the DCNR Calendar of Events at http://events.dcnr.pa.gov

 

Winter Women in the Wilds event offers ladies an opportunity to learn winter outdoor skills. Photo 1: Park Manager, Lisa Bainey, on left, teaches an introductory cross country class.  Photo 2: Program participant, Lin Kline, learns to cross country ski at the Wildlife Center at Sinnemahoning State Park.

 

Ridgway based state police have arrested Matthew Cunningham of St.Marys for theft of leased property. Authorities claim Cunningham was found to have re3nted equipment from Burkes Home Center in Fox Township and has not paid for it.

 

Two area men have been charged with possession drug paraphernalia. According to troopers at the Kane barracks both David Wolfe (23) and Mark Chittester (24) no addresses provided  were found in possession of glass pipes used for smoking pot and when their vehicle was pulled over on Clay Street in Kane last Friday night for a turn signal violation.

 

Obituaries

 Doyle L. Cleveland, 60, of Roulette, formerly of Olean, N.Y., passed away on Wednesday, January 10, 2018 in Cole Memorial Hospital, Coudersport, after a prolonged illness.

Born on October 9, 1957 in Olean, N.Y., he was a son of Edward and Ruth Cole Cleveland.  On April 20, 2003 in Roulette, he married Denice M. Moore, who survives.

Doyle attended Olean High School.  He was employed by Cattaraugus County Meals on Wheels and later worked for Morgan A M & T in Coudersport, retiring due to ill health.

Doyle enjoyed technology and loved raising big dogs.

Surviving besides his wife are six children, Jason Nobles, Kyle Cleveland, Brandon Cleveland, Renae Rich, Brandon Rich, and Roy Rich; fourteen grandchildren; two great-grandchildren; four siblings, Marion Black, Edward Cleveland, George Cleveland, and Sharon Hanigan; and many nieces and nephews.

In addition to his parents, Doyle was predeceased by six brothers and sisters.

A celebration of Doyle’s life will be held at 1pm on Saturday, January 20, 2018, at Calvary Baptist Church, Coudersport, with Pastor William Moore, Doyle’s father-in-law, officiating.

In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to the American Cancer Society in memory of Doyle and his brother, Clifford.

Doyle’s family has entrusted his care to Kevin J. Dusenbury, funeral director/owner of the Virgil L. Howard Funeral Home, Shinglehouse.

To express condolences or share a fond memory of Doyle, please visit www.virgillhowardfuneralhome.com

 

David E. “Dave” Cutler, 64, of Bolivar, N.Y., formerly of Smethport, Pa., passed away unexpectedly on Friday, January 12, 2018, in Strong Memorial Hospital, Rochester.

Born on January 20, 1953 in Shinglehouse, he was a son of Ed W. and Rocelia Lawton Cutler.

Dave was a graduate of Oswayo Valley High School in Shinglehouse.  He was formerly employed by the Smethport Borough Water Treatment Plant.

He was a former member of the Smethport Volunteer Fire Department. He enjoyed hunting, wood carving, metal working—especially making knives, and reading.  His greatest love was his family.

Surviving are two sons, Aaron D. Cutler of Bolivar and Todd W. (Andrea) Cutler of York, Pa.; eight grandchildren; two sisters, Bess Cooper of California and Helen Cutler of Friendship; a brother, Joel Cutler of Shinglehouse; and many nieces and nephews, grandnieces, and grandnephews.

In addition to his parents, Dave was predeceased by three brothers, Ed Cutler, Jr., Donald Cutler, and Newton Cutler; and three sisters, Nancy Cutler, Nellie Stone, and EdraUmbaugh.

In keeping with Dave’s wishes there will be no public visitation.  A celebration of Dave’s life will be held on a date and place to be announced.

In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to a local library in Dave’s memory.

Dave’s family has entrusted his care to Kevin J. Dusenbury, funeral director/owner of the Virgil L. Howard Funeral Home, Shinglehouse.

To express condolences or share a fond memory of Dave, please visit www.virgillhowardfuneralhome.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Tioga County Region for the Pennsylvania Lyme Resource Network will present “Under Our Skin,” the untold story of Lyme disease, an exceedingly complex and often misunderstood disease.

 

This documentary film will be shown during the first meeting of the Tioga County Lyme Disease Support Group at 6:30 p.m. on Thursday, Jan. 18 at the Tokishi Training Center at 124 Nypum Drive in Wellsboro. A question and answer session will follow, led by Linda Wales of Millerton, founder of A Hope for Lyme in Horseheads, New York.

 

Luke Dunham and Thomas Putnam, both from the Wellsboro area, are regional co-leaders with the network and both have been diagnosed with and are being treated for Lyme disease and/or co-infections. They recently formed the Tioga County support group under the auspices of the Pennsylvania Lyme Resource Network, an all-volunteer statewide organization founded in 2012 by individuals with personal experiences with Lyme, Lyme co-infections and other tick-borne diseases, which can be contracted at the same time as Lyme from a tick bite.

 

Lyme disease has been confirmed in all 67 counties in Pennsylvania. The Commonwealth leads the nation in the number of cases diagnosed annually.

 

A 501c3 nonprofit, the network provides education, patient advocacy, support and resources to help others navigate Lyme and tick-borne illnesses in the Commonwealth and also supports regional and independent Lyme groups across the state that hold local meetings to give support, education, and resources to their local communities.

 

The  Tioga County Lyme Disease Support Group will meet regularly on the third Thursday of each month from 6:30-8 p.m. The next meeting will be on Thursday, Feb. 16 at the Tokishi Training Center in Wellsboro.

 

For more information, contact Dunham and Putnam by email at tiogacountylyme@palyme.org or by calling Putnam at 570-439-2000.

 

 

The website Lymediseas.org reports

ew York Governor Andrew Cuomo this week laid out a wide-ranging agenda that included specific provisions related to Lyme and other tick-borne diseases.

Here’s the text of what he proposed in hisState of the State book:

Proposal: Implement a Lyme and Tick-Borne Disease Control Plan

In August 2017, the New York State Department of Health launched a multi-faceted initiative to safeguard New Yorkers from tick-borne diseases with expanded tick surveillance and an aggressive awareness and outreach campaign in collaboration with the Department of Environmental Conservation.

However, in some part of New York State, tick-borne diseases are on the rise, posing a threat to both individual New Yorkers and our regional economies that rely on outdoor recreation. Each year, there are approximately 8,000 cases of Lyme disease, 700 cases of 266 anaplasmosis, 400 cases of babesiosis, 100 cases of ehrlichiosis, and 30 cases of other tick-borne illnesses reported to the Department of Health—with many other cases going unreported. And 2017 also brought deadly cases of the rare tick-borne disease Powassan.

In 2018, Governor Cuomo will launch an aggressive initiative to reduce the incidence of Lyme Disease and other tick-borne illnesses in New York State, by controlling tick populations on public lands, advancing research on diagnostics and treatment, and further increasing public awareness.

First, the Governor will direct the Departments of Health and Environmental Conservation, and the Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation to launch a tick reduction strategy targeting priority counties and public lands with the highest risk of tick exposure and Lyme disease. Tick control methods will include strategic application of ecofriendly tick control treatments to high traffic trails and facilities, as well the expanded use of 4-poster tickicide stations to treat deer and traps to treat rodents.

Second, the Governor will direct the Commissioner of Health to establish a new working group on Lyme and other tickborne diseases to review current strategies and improve the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of tick-borne diseases in New York State.

The DOH Wadsworth Center will work with private partners to explore ways to improve diagnostic testing and treatment for Lyme and other tick-borne diseases, as better solutions are needed to protect New Yorkers. Third, the Department of Health will continue its robust public outreach campaigns and also convene a tick-borne disease summit this spring, bringing together national experts, members of the new working group and local health departments to review New York’s existing initiatives, and to make recommendations for future policy actions.

 

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Registration Now Open for Winter Women in the Wilds

 

Sinnemahoning State Park is now accepting registrations for the 2018 Winter Women in the Wilds event, which will be held at the park during the weekend of February 16-18, 2018.

 

The Women in the Wilds event at Sinnemahoning State Park is a ladies-only weekend of outdoor recreation and environmental education. The 2018 Winter WITW event offers women the opportunity to participate in activities such as cross-country skiing, snowshoeing, ice skating, fly tying, nature painting, essential oils, animal tracking, open hearth cooking, winter bird walk and indoor yoga.

 

Program fee is $70 per person. Fee includes choice of seven outdoor recreation and interpretive classes, Friday evening snacks, lunch and dinner on Saturday, lunch on Sunday, plus all program materials and supplies. Equipment for cross country skiing, snowshoeing, and ice skating will be provided. Sizes are limited. Program fee does not include overnight accommodations or breakfast either day.  A list of local cabins, B&Bs, and motels will be provided upon request.

 

Pre-registration and pre-payment required by Saturday, February 3rd. Limit 30 people.

 

For more information about Women in the Wilds or other programs at Sinnemahoning State Park, please call the park office at 814-647-8401.  Additional details can be found on the DCNR Calendar of Events at http://events.dcnr.pa.gov

 

 

 

Winter Women in the Wilds event offers ladies an opportunity to learn winter outdoor skills. Photo 1: Park Manager, Lisa Bainey, on left, teaches an introductory cross country class.  Photo 2: Program participant, Lin Kline, learns to cross country ski at the Wildlife Center at Sinnemahoning State

 


Monday January 15, 2018

Sunday’s high, 19; Overnight low,-6; no new snow

MON-MOSTLY SUNNY > MOSTLY CLOUDY, HIGH IN THE LOW 20S

MON NIGHT-LIGHT SNOW 1-3”; NOT AS COLD, LOW 18

TUE-MOSTLY CLOUDY, CHANCE OF AM SNOW SHOWERS, HIGH IN THE UPPER 20s

TUE NIGHT-MOSTLY CLOUDY, COLD +5

WED-PARTLY SUNNY, HIGH 20

WED NIGHT-MOSTLY CLOUDY, LOW -5

BFB Headlines (Monday January 15, 2018) A Weedville man died from exposure and a medical problem while on a Side by Side ride over the weekend…Austin woman and teen passenger unhurt in weather related crash lst week….injuries reported for a Coudersport woman in head-on collision a few minutes later…Coudersport teen driver and passenger unhurt in one-vehicle mishap Saturday….Elk County driver cited for failing to yield to another vehicle after crash Friday…..Coudersport man cited for driving too closely after rear-end collision Friday near Port Allegany…Blossoburg woman arrested for speeding after her car crashed when it ran into a large pothole….Ulysses man accused of illegally buying $3400 in fuel……Cyber criminals make illegal purchases using Shinglehouse woman’s bank account information…Homer Township man arrested for plugging township culvert to divert flood waters….,Election law violation in Bingham Township this past November investigated by troopers in Coudersport…Next on-air report after 12:06p today on www.blckforestbroadcasting.com

To hear today’s podcast, click on arrow below.

A Weedville man died accidentally over the weekend according to state police at Ridgeway. When 54 year old Scot Winslow failed to return to his home on Saturday after a Side by Side ride, a search was initiated. Winslow’s body was found Sunday in a wooded area off of Apple Street in Jay Township. Authorities report Winslow died from hypothermia and a medical condition while riding the machine.

An Austin woman and her passenger escaped injury in a weather-related accident Monday afternoon on Route 872 in Homer Township. Troopers reported Brenda Siebert was going south when her Jeep Liberty a patch of slush and snow and struck  an embankment before rolling over onto the driver’s side. Siebert and a 15 year old male passenger were not using seatbelts but were not hurt.

A Coudersport woman was hurt a few minutes later  in a collision on Route 6 in Eulalia Township. Troopers just released details reporting Kayla Hardesty was going when her Pontiac Grand Prix went out of control on a right hand curve. The car continued to slide after Hardesty applied the brakes, hit a section of guardrails and bounced into the opposite lane where it collided head-on with a Dodge Ram driven by Thomas Scott of Johnstown, PA. Volunteer firefighters extricated Hardesty from the wreckage. She was taken by ambulance to Charles Cole Hospital by ambulance. A one yeas old girl  riding in a child safety seat was unhurt as was Scott.

Two Coudersport teens escaped injury Saturday morning when a Hyundai Accent driven by 18 year old Ryan Brown slid through the intersection of Empson Road and Route 49 in Ulysses Township and collided with some guardrails. Brown and his passenger, 18 year old Paige Tilley were seat belted when Brown braked as  he approached the intersection.

The names of a Sigel, PA driver and his passenger have not yet been released by state police at Ridgway. The 29 year old driver was life flighted  to UPMC in Altoona with serious injuries. The 27 year passenger from Kersey was treated at Penn Highlands Elk for minor injuries. Police said due to the extent of the injuries, they are awating notification to next of kin before releasing names.

State police at Ridgway have charged a Kersey man for failing to obey stop and yield signs after a collision Friday afternoon at the intersection of Toby Road, Dagus Mine road and  in Fox Township, Elk County. Authorities related  Timothy Nelson failed to yield to a Honda Accord driven by  William Hillebrand also of Kersey causing his Kia Rio to slam into the driver’s side of Willebrand’s Honda Accord. Nelson was arrested for suspicion of DUI.

About an hour later, a Ford Escape driven by James Tucker of Coudersport slid into the back of a Ford E-350 driven by Jason Luce of Kennedy, NY which had slowed down to almost a stop for a school bus with flashing lights. Tucker was cited for following too closely for the 3:45 pm collision.

Mansfield based state police allege Andrew Derenzo was going too fast for conditions when his Toyota Corolla slid across the median on ice covered Route 15 in Lawrence Township Friday night. The car impacted a ditch before stopping. Derenzo was not charged.

A Blossburg woman was cited for speeding after her car wrecked last Thursday night in Bloss Township, Tioga County. According to state police at Mansfield, Kimberly Root’s Chevrolet Trail Blazer spun off the S. Williamson Road after hitting a large pothole at intersection with an unnamed street. The SUV became airborne and traveled over a four foot embankment before hitting a tree with the passenger side. The unit spun clockwise about 180 degrees before  stopping.

Mansfield based state police have arrested 31 year old Patrick Tomb of Ulysses for an ID theft. Authorities claim Tomb used a co-worker’s PIN to obtain gas for his personal vehicle totaling $3400 between March and December 2017.

Unknown cyber thieves used Shinglehouse resident Kristen Clower’s bank account  to make several unlawful purchases January 3 or 4. The investigation is continuing.

A Byrnedale man was committed to the Elk County Prison last Friday afternoon after arraigned for simple assault. Troopers explained 32 year old Jeffrey Gray and a 46 year old man and a 66 year old man were arguing when Gray allegedly punched the 46 year old man in the face and subjected the 66 year old man to physical contact when he tried to break up the fight.

Coudersport based state police have charged 69  year old John Charles Miller of Coudersport with disorderly conduct for an incident allegedly taking place Friday morning. Authorities assert Miller intentionally plugged a Homer Township culvert pipe with mud and rocks to prevent water from running into his yard causing flooding on nearby roadways creating a hazard  for drivers.

Troopers at Coudersport are continuing to investigate a reported election violation. Two Bingham Township women and a Bingham township man campaign inside of and within 10 feet of the Bingham Township Building during the November 7, 2017 election in violation of state law.

Friday January 12, 2018

The National Weather Service in State College PA has issued a

* Flood Warning for Urban Areas and Small Streams in…
Eastern McKean County in north central Pennsylvania…
Potter County in north central Pennsylvania…

* Until 1000 PM EST

* At 718 PM EST, local law enforcement reported flooding in
Shinglehouse Borough in the area of Horse Run and Low Street and
in Galeton Borough with ice jams on Pine Creek near Telescope
Road.

* Some locations that will experience flooding include…
Cross Fork, Galeton, Harrison Valley, Cherry Springs State Park,
Roulette, Genesee, Keating Summit, Denton Hill State Park,
Shinglehouse and Wharton.

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS…

Turn around, don`t drown when encountering flooded roads. Most flood
deaths occur in vehicles.

Be especially cautious at night when it is harder to recognize the
dangers of flooding.

Excessive runoff from heavy rainfall will cause flooding of small
creeks and streams, country roads, farmland, and other low lying
spots.

Photo by Gerri Miller

Roulette Twp. workers removed flood debris and ice jam from around new bridge on Atkins Road Friday morning.

The West Branch of Fishing Creek is closed due to flooding.

The East Branch and Atkins Road are open  although the creek is over its bank and there are places with water over the  the road.

Wiemer Baseball field  and the park at the intersection of Route 6 and Fishing Creek Road were under water.

2.9 ” of rain fell overnight on Fishing Creek. Another .25″ between 7::00 AM and 8:30 am.

Thursday’s high, 54; overnight low, 49; 2.90 ” of rain overnight’ .25″ this morning

FRI-RAIN OFF AND ON, HIGH 56
FRI NIGHT-FREEZING RAIN/SLEET/SNOW LOW 13
SAT-CHANCE OF MORNING SNOW, HIGH 17; WC 0
SAT NIGHT-MOSTLY CLOUDY,LOW 0; WC-10
SUN-MOSTLY SUNNY, HIGH 16
SUN NIGHT-MOSTLY CLOUDY, LOW 1

To hear weekend forecast, click on arrow below.

Flooding reported throughout the region…
Red Mill Bridge in McKean County closed due to high water…Floodwatch remains in effect..and a winter storm warning has been posted….Heavy snow predicted….Stay inside and enoy Eagle Cam this weekend….DEP schedules public hearing in Coudersport next week for water treatment facility. …PA Farm Show concludes Saturday….Bradford man accused of driving without ignition interlock device….Two Tioga County residents arrested for harassment…..

To hear today’s podcast, click on arrow below.

Motorists are advised that the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation (PennDOT) has temporarily closed a Route 146 (Red Mill Road) bridge in McKean County. The bridge spans Red Mill Brook near the intersection of Creekside Drive in Norwich Township.

PennDOT closed the bridge earlier today after flood waters crested the bridge surface. It will remain closed until waters recede and an inspection crew can access the bridge for potential damage. PennDOT does not expect the bridge to open any earlier than late Tuesday, January 16. Motorists are advised to choose alternate routes until the closure has been lifted.

The bridge was originally constructed in 1934. It is 28 feet long and carries an average of more than 200 vehicles daily.

 

Classes were cancelled at some area schools today because of flooding or potential flooding. Oswayo Valley students were released st noon. Several volunteer fire departments were kept busy responding to Due to the impending flooding and ice this afternoon, the students of the Oswayo Valley School District were dismissed at noon. There will be no CTC, no afternoon pre-kindergarten, and all evening activities are canceled for Friday and Saturday. The book swap, movie night, and potato dinner at the elementary school have been rescheduled for January 19, 2018.flooded basements. Star Hose volunteers were recalled after being dispatched mid-morning to help a family evacute a mobile home on Coleman Mills Road.

The Flood Watch continues for

* A portion of central Pennsylvania, including the following
counties, Cameron, Clearfield, Columbia, Elk, McKean, Montour,
Northern Centre, Northern Clinton, Northern Lycoming,
Northumberland, Potter, Snyder, Southern Centre, Southern
Clinton, Southern Lycoming, Sullivan, Tioga, Union, and Warren.

* Through Saturday evening

* Periods of rain will continue to fall over the area today, some
of which could be heavy this morning. 1 to 3 inches of rain are
expected across the watch area by early this evening. The rain
is expected to change to a wintry mix by late this evening and
eventually snow overnight.

* Area waterways are covered with ice due to our recent arctic
outbreak. Rapidly rising stream and river levels may lead to a
break up of the ice, leading to localized ice jam flooding, as
the ice collects at constrictions. The most susceptible areas
are at bridges or bends in the river, where ice jams could clog
the flow, causing water to back up onto land.

Keep an eye on area waterways and be alert for sudden rises.

Review flood safety and preparedness information at
weather.gov/flood.

The National Weather Service in State College issued a
* Flash Flood Warning for…
Rain and Snowmelt in…
Western Elk County in north central Pennsylvania…
McKean County in north central Pennsylvania…

* Until 7:30 pm
* At 629 AM EST, Doppler radar and automated rain gauges indicated
heavy rain falling across the warned area. Rapid snowmelt is also
occurring and will add to the flooding. Flooding is reported
across McKean County and portions of Route 770 and 346 are closed.
An Ice Jam is reported on Minard Run.

* Some locations that will experience flooding include…
Bradford, Ridgway, Kane, Johnsonburg, St. Marys, Crosby, Rew,
Ludlow, Marshburg and East Branch Dam.
Recommended actions
Turn around, don`t drown when encountering flooded roads. Most flood
deaths occur in vehicles.

Area fire departments were kept busy pumping out basements across the region. Star Hose Volunteers in Port Allegany were recalled after being dispatched to help a family evacuate a mobile home near near Coleman Creek.

Meanwhile a Winter Storm Warning is in effect from7p this evening to 10a EST Sturday.

Heavy mixed precipitation expected. Plan on difficult
travel conditions. Total snow accumulations of 5 to 8 inches
and ice accumulations of around one tenth of an inch are
expected in otter, Elk and Cameron Counties.
Rain will change to a wintry mix after dusk this evening,
then snow by around midnight. Expect the snow to taper off by
late Saturday morning.

Be prepared for significant reductions in
visibility late tonight.The Pennsylvania Department of Transportation and Pennsylvania
Turnpike Commission strongly encourage motorists to heed all
travel restrictions and delay unnecessary travel. Visit
www.511pa.com for the latest travel, roadway and traffic
conditions on major highways.

PennDOTDistrict 2 is alerting drivers that heavy rainfall, falling temperatures, and expected snow in the northcentral region could impact travel through Saturday. Rainfall overnight could cause roadway flooding and falling temperatures could then bring flash freezing and sleet. Snowfall will follow the rain, bringing added challenges for drivers. District 2 includes Cameron, Centre, Clearfield, Clinton, Elk, Juniata, McKean, Mifflin, and Potter counties.
Through much of the region, snow accumulations of up to 6 inches are possible, with as much as a foot of snow possible in northwest areas of the region. While accumulation could be slight in southern counties, winds and low temperatures could combine with the snowfall to make conditions slippery and challenging.
PennDOT recommends avoiding travel during winter storms if possible, but motorists who must be on the road are urged to use caution while driving and offers this advice:
Don’t drive through standing water.
⦁ Slow down and drive at a speed that suits the conditions.
⦁ Turn on your headlights.
⦁ Increase your following distance.
⦁ Reduce in-car distractions.
⦁ Use defroster and wipers.
⦁ Keep windows and mirrors free of snow and ice.
⦁ Use four-way flashers when traveling slowly.
⦁ Always buckle up and never drink and drive.

PennDOTsays it is prepared d, with plow trucks and other equipment ready. Salt, anti-skid and other materials are in good supply. Crews will be working around the clock if necessary to keep roads safe and passable.

Motorists are reminded that roadways will not be free of snow while precipitation is falling. With freezing temperatures, roads that look wet may be icy, and extra caution is needed when approaching bridges and highway ramps where ice can form without warning. Motorists should leave plenty of space – six car lengths — when following a truck that is plowing or spreading winter materials.
To help make decisions as to whether to travel during winter weather, motorists are encouraged to “Know Before You Go” by checking conditions on more than 40,000 roadway miles, including color-coded winter conditions on 2,900 miles, by visiting www.511PA.com. 511PA, which is free and available 24 hours a day, provides traffic delay warnings, weather forecasts, traffic speed information and access to more than 850 traffic cameras. Users can also see plow truck statuses and travel alerts along a specific route using the “Check My Route” tool.
511PA is also available through a smartphone application for iPhone and Android devices, by calling 5-1-1, or by following regional Twitter alerts accessible on the 511PA website.
PennDOT reminds motorists to pack an emergency kit for their vehicles. A basic kit should include non-perishable food, water, blanket, small shovel and warm clothes. When preparing an emergency kit, motorists should consider special needs of passengers such as baby food, pet supplies or medications and pack accordingly.
PennDOT also reminds citizens that downloadable materials, including home and car emergency kit checklists and emergency plan templates, are available at www.ReadyPA.org or by calling 1-888-9-READYPA. Citizens can find information about getting involved in local emergency response efforts and other volunteer opportunities through the Web site or the toll-free line.
For more information on winter driving and PennDOT operations, visit www.penndot.gov/winter.
For regional updates on Twitter, follow www.twiiter.com\511PAStateCOLL

With severe winter weather predicted for this weekend, it might be a good time to stay in side and take advantage of the roun-the-clock opportunity to view bald eagles at close range. The Pennsylvania Game Commission’s Eagle Cam is back online, offering viewers worldwide 24-7 access to live video and audio captured at a bald-eagle nest in Hanover, Pa.

The Eagle Cam is provided through a partnership among the Game Commission, HDOnTap, Comcast Business and Codorus State Park.

Once again this year, the Eagle Cam features two cameras, each equipped with a microphone, placed 75 feet high in a tree adjacent to Codorus State Park. Eagles have nested at the tree for more than a decade, and have successfully fledged young there many times.

While the 2017 run of the Eagle Cam at the same tree was successful, with two eaglets hatching in March and taking their first flights in June, there was some question whether the Eagle Cam would be back at the same tree in 2018.

The nest, which had partially collapsed and was rebuilt ahead of the 2017 nesting season, collapsed further since the Eagle Cam last was online. But once again, the adult eagles using the nest tree have rebuilt the nest, and appear to have it ready for another go in the coming months.

Game Commission Executive Director Bryan J. Burhans said the uncertainty of what will happen next is part of why so many Eagle Cam viewers regularly tune in. As many as 1.5 million viewers have watched the Eagle Cam during a single nesting season.

View the eagle cam.

Twitter and Facebook users also can share the Eagle Cam with friends by tweeting #PGCEagleCam.

The Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) will hold a public meeting, followed by a public hearing, to discuss permitting for the proposed Epiphany Allegheny LLC water treatment facility, located in Eulalia Township, Potter County.
Both events will be held on Tuesday, January 16, 2018 at the Gunzburger Building, 1 North Main Street, Coudersport, PA. The public meeting will begin at 5:30 PM, when DEP and the applicant will discuss the proposed project and permit requirements. The public hearing will begin at 7:00 PM, during which time citizens may present oral testimony regarding the proposed project and application process.
Those wishing to speak should register onsite prior to 7:00 PM. Comments are limited to five minutes per person.
Written comments of any length may also be provided to Thomas Randis, Environmental Program Manager, at 208 West Third Street, Suite 101, Williamsport, PA 17701, or via email atRA-EPNCEPIPHANY@pa.gov, no later than January 29, 2018.
Questions about the permitting process should be directed to Thomas Randis at 570-327-0530.
Individuals in need of an accommodation as provided for in the Americans With Disabilities Act of 1990 should contact Megan Lehman at 570-327-3659, or through the Pennsylvania AT&T Relay Service at 1-800-654-5984 (TDD users), or 1-800-654-5988 (Voice Users), to discuss how DEP may accommodate your needs.

The 102nd PA Farm Show will conclude Saturday afternon. Today is Resource Conservation farmland preservation and best management practices for conservation are being highlighted.The nations largest indoor agricultural event features 12,000 competitive exhibits, more than 5,200 of which are animal competitions, plus 300 commercial exhibitors.
Friday’s schedule:
8 a.m.           Breeding Sheep Judging (SA)
Dairy Cattle Judging (EA)
Open Dairy Goat Judging (NW)
10 a.m.         Maple Production Demonstration by the PA Maple Syrup Producers (CCS)
Tractor Square Dancing (LA)
PA Mohair Demonstration by T. Kunst (GFS)
11 a.m.         Todd Lewis, Chef Instructor, PA Department of Corrections (CCS)
Draft Horse Hitch and Drive (LA)
Agri-Magic Show (GFS)
12 p.m.         Maureen Fowler, Sous Chef at Devon Seafood Grill (CCS)
Make It and Take It: Cookie Mix, Sponsored by Golden Barrel (EL)
Fiber Works Resource Center Demonstration (GFS)
1 p.m.           The Best Rib and Beer Competition presented by the PA Pork Producers Council (CCS)
Tractor Square Dancing (LA)
Fiber Art Demonstration by E. Anderson (GFS)
2 p.m.           Bill Collier, Executive Chef at Bricco (CCS)
Agri-Magic Show (GFS)
2:30 p.m.      Celebrity Cow Milking Contest (EA)
3 p.m.           Thomas J. Long, Director of Campus Dining at HACC’s The Chef’s Apprentice (CCS)
3:30 p.m.      Junior Dairy Cattle Showmanship (EA)
4 p.m.           Chef Instructor David T. Mills III and HACC, Central PA’s Community College, Students (CCS)
5 p.m.           School Cooking Challenge with HACC, Central PA’s Community College, Students (CCS)
Golden Barrel Sticky Bun Contest (GFS)
6 p.m.           Honey Extraction Demonstration by the Pennsylvania State Beekeepers Association (CCS)
PA Equine Showcase (EA)                                                                                                                                                                                                                     Experience Milking a Cow (SA)
7 p.m.           PRCA Circuit Finals Rodeo (LA)
A Bradford man has been arrested for an ignition int4erlock violation. Kane based state police explained when they pulled 62 yearold Anthony Giordano over for an equipment violation on Main Street in the city last Saturday night they found he was driving a vehicle witout ignition Interlock equipment as is required for those convicted of DUI.
Two Tioga County residents have been cited for harassment for separate incidents. Trooers sai Keith Monroe, 38 of Tioga, PA made threatening statements to 31 year old Jordan Butler of Troupsburg when argued over a woman at the Pump and Pantry in Tioga Borough. Brenda Mattis of Millerton was arrested after she allegedly twisted and pinched Loree Lisk at Bakercrest Home in Rutland Township Thursday.
Obituary
Robert C. HOWELL, III, 42, of Genesee, PA, formerly Waycross, GA, died Tuesday, January 9, 2018 in Jones Memorial Hospital, Wellsville, NY.

Born September 11, 1975, in Waycross, GA, he was the son of Robert C. and Faye Mobley Howell, Jr.

Surviving are:  his wife, Candace M. Brower of Genesee;  three children, Robert H. Howell, Katerina Howell, and Amelia Howell;  two step-children, Gabrielle Thompson-Brower and Harley Thompson-Brower;  four sisters, Barbara Hauser, Brenda McClellen, Genia Leggett, and Becky Jones;  nieces and nephews.  He was predeceased by his parents.

Services will be private.

Arrangements are entrusted to Olney Funeral Home & Cremation Service, Ulysses, PA.

Online condolences may be expresses at www.olneyfuneralhome.com.